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Review

12

Mar
2015

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Nonfiction Review: Women of Steel and Stone by Anna Lewis

On 12, Mar 2015 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Women of Steel

Women of Steel and Stone: 22 Inspirational Architects, Engineers, and Landscape Designers by Anna M. Lewis

Women of Steel and Stone is a really good introduction to women in fields that are traditionally dominated by men. The mix of engineers, architects and landscape architects was really interesting and there was a lot of additional information beyond the 22 main women about other women and about the fields themselves.

There is still such a stigma of women in math and science fields so it’s really important that we give young girls examples of women who have gone into these fields. And these women are an impressive set of examples! Here, though, is where my professional opinion of the book (kids will like this!) and my personal opinion (it wasn’t the best fit) diverge.

As far as the intended age, it’s definitely a book for older readers based on length and difficulty of text. However, it’s really wonderful because each profile is a fairly short, quick read. I could see kids in middle and high school picking this up and putting it down as they have the time to read about the women. Books like that are so important for all these busy kids.

The women and their lives were really interesting and I can see kids connecting with the subjects. I, personally, wanted way more information and would have preferred that the author chose fewer profiles so she could focus more. But  I really think that is coming from someone who is interested in how women have broken into male-dominated fields and someone who wanted to see more of how they balanced their personal (marriage and motherhood) lives with their professional lives that appeared to be very demanding. Will kids want to know all about that? Highly unlikely. I think for kids the book will pique their interest in the fields of architecture, engineering, and landscape design and in the women themselves. They might seek out more information beyond this book.

Lewis was really good about including a section at the end of each profile that gave the reader places to go to find more information. And it’s quite the mix of resources. Within the chapters there were boxes that added little bits about other women who had impacts, but didn’t get entire profiles. I found their placement (in the middle of paragraphs) very distracting and found myself skipping them. I think a side bar would have been better or even a chapter at the end of each section that had these brief asides aggregated. I know that’s a design, not author issue, but that kind of stuff drives me nuts and if I am skipping it then kids probably will too.

My only other complaint is that I wanted a lot more pictures. There weren’t very many (I’m guessing for space?) and the ones that are there have terrible captions that offer little to no information about how they link up with the women’s careers, with their profession, or why they are important. Often buildings were talked about in the text, but there were no pictures to accompany it. Nonfiction for kids has to be engaging and it has to have more pictures than adult nonfiction. Kids are likely not to go out of their way to find pictures of the buildings and structures these women have created. Pictures give an entry point for younger readers into the book and the topic.

The exclusion of women from these professions early on will really appeal to kids’ sense of justice and I think it will hit home how far women have come and how far they need to go. Lewis includes a range of women from the early years of the professions to much more recent and contemporary women (both in terms of design and age). Many of the women she profiles are still alive and some are still working. By including this range you can really see how the professions have developed both in broad terms and in terms of including women and taking them seriously.

The introductions to each section were very interesting. Lewis details the history of the profession (most of them were not formalized until the late 1800s) and what it takes to get a degree or certification in each profession. She also includes lists of colleges that have highly regarded undergraduate and graduate degree programs. All in all a great book to dip in and out of and to whet the appetite of budding architects and engineers.

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