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2016 January

20

Jan
2016

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Up in the Garden Down in the Dirt by Kate Messner

On 20, Jan 2016 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Up in the GardenUp in the Garden and Down in the Dirt written by Kate Messner, illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal

From Goodreads: In this exuberant and lyrical follow-up to the award-winning Over and Under the Snow, discover the wonders that lie hidden between stalks, under the shade of leaves . . . and down in the dirt. Explore the hidden world and many lives of a garden through the course of a year! Up in the garden, the world is full of green—leaves and sprouts, growing vegetables, ripening fruit. But down in the dirt exists a busy world—earthworms dig, snakes hunt, skunks burrow—populated by all the animals that make a garden their home.

I am a sucker for garden books. Even more so if they follow the garden through the seasons. The passing of seasons is the best part of gardening. Up in the Garden and Down in the Dirt is exactly that kind of garden book which is why I picked it up. However, I am not the target audience. I have now read the book several times to my daughter who is more or less interested in it.

Through this book I found the other book by this author-illustrator pair. My daughter is a lot more interested in that one, I think because snow is such a foreign concept to us. Both books have a great end section that discusses the different animals you see throughout the book giving more detail and information.

The illustrations are sweet and interesting and a little child-like. The cut aways of the soil are really what fascinates my daughter and is one of the things that make the book stand out. I love that the grandmother is the one showing the girl about gardening and isn’t your bespectacled, bun-headed stereotype. She looks a little more fashionable and younger, which is more inline with grandmothers I see these days (including my daughter’s three grandmothers).

The book doesn’t win any points for diversity, which leads me to say it’s recommended if you are in a school that has a garden or gardening unit, but is only really necessary as an addition to a collection of garden books. It’s one I’ll add to our home collection, because I can’t help myself, and the other librarian bought it for our first grade and pre-kindergarten who do garden units, but otherwise I would have passed.

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13

Jan
2016

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: In a Village by the Sea by Muon Van

On 13, Jan 2016 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

In a villageIn a Village by the Sea written by Muon Van, illustrated by April Chu

From Goodreads: Written in a spare, lyrical style using fresh, evocative imagery, In a Village by the Sea tells the story of longing for the comforts of home. A perfect book for teaching about diverse cultures and lifestyles through rich pictures and words, moving from the wide world to the snugness of home and back out again.

I love these kinds of books for bedtime stories. They are a bit poetic and sing-songy which makes them comforting and lull you to sleep. The story follows the pattern of The House in the Night or the nursery rhyme that is book based on “Key to the Kingdom”. Each verse pulls you in a little closer or out a little further from the starting point. In a Village gives it a bit of a special twist by ending in a different place from the start, but with a nod to the fishing boat out at sea.

I think because of the bedtime story feel and the young audience it may be intended for, it’s not an absolute necessity for school library collections. However, because both the setting and the authors are Vietnamese it’s one every library should consider purchasing. The book makes for a great read aloud and there is a lot to look at and discuss in the illustrations if you give it the time.

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11

Jan
2016

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Red by Jan De Kinder

On 11, Jan 2016 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

RedRed written and illustrated by Jan De Kinder

From Goodreads: In this poignant story, a girl finds it funny when her classmate starts blushing on the school playground. Her friends laugh along with her, but one student takes the teasing too far. Torn between her sympathy for her classmate and her fear of the bully, the girl must make a difficult choice.

I have a long list of picture books I’ve read and need to review and many of them are fading to the point that I am re-checking them out from the library to refresh my memory. However I decided to tackle Red today even though I read (ha!) it yesterday and have to bump it up the list.

The basic premise of the book is that a child on the playground blushes and a little girl, the narrator of the story, points it out. This starts a wave of teasing led primarily by a twit of a kid named Paul. The little girl who originally pointed out the redness (hence the title) realizes her mistake and wants to stand up to Paul, but she’s cowed by him and the fear that she may be alone.

The illustrations are sparse in cream, black, white, gray and red. The use of white space and limited palate really make it feel very modern and clean. Red in particular is used to great effect through out the story and not just on the little boy’s cheeks.

I bought it for our library in part because we are having problems with bullying across the grades (even in Kindergarten!!) and think we need more books the teachers can use in their classrooms when these issues arise. I also bought it because I wanted to read it per a long-forgotten review of it and the public library curiously did not have it.

The one problem I see with the book is that it’s probably a story better suited to use in classrooms. It’s the kind of book adults love, but kids don’t necessarily click with. It won’t be one they ask to read over and over again (for starters the story, despite it’s happy ending, is kind of depressing). I think students will understand the message and will enjoy the story and conversations it will induce, but it’s not quite the type of story that children will be drawn to. And if they are I suspect it will be because the message really resonates with their current situation.

Despite this, I highly recommend this book for school library collections and classroom libraries. We all deal with bullying situations and need to address them and this book is an excellent starting place. It has a Message with a capital m, but it doesn’t feel preachy. I think it especially speaks to the kids who are bystanders and the fear they feel about speaking out. It may give them courage to stop what they see and it definitely gives teachers a place to start the conversation.

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06

Jan
2016

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Yard Sale by Eve Bunting

On 06, Jan 2016 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Yard SaleYard Sale written by Eve Bunting, illustrated by Lauren Castillo

From Goodreads: Almost everything Callie’s family owns is spread out in their front yard—their furniture, their potted flowers, even Callie’s bike. They can’t stay in this house, so they’re moving to an apartment in the city. The new place is “small but nice,” Mom says, and most of their things won’t fit, so today they are having a yard sale. But it’s kind of hard to watch people buy your stuff, even if you understand why it has to happen. With sensitivity and grace, Eve Bunting and Lauren Castillo portray an event at once familiar and difficult, making clear that a home isn’t about what you have, but whom you hold close.

I was kind of meh on this one even though I know a lot of other people liked it. The message in it was great and I think the comment the woman makes to Callie at the yard sale is spot on and I know it shows a reality for a lot of kids during the recession. I just didn’t personally click with the story.

I am always looking for books that help kids understand that things are not nearly as important as our society would have you believe and this one fits the bill. An older woman approaches Callie at the yard sale and asks if she is for sale prompting a huge gush of tears from Callie (unsurprisingly). Her parents quickly shut down the yard sale and help Callie understand both that she is not for sale and what was out on the lawn was just stuff and in the scheme of things really unimportant. Especially when compared to their family.

Callie’s family is moving into a smaller space (an apartment if memory serves me) and they have to sell most of their belongings. Callie is struggling with this idea and spends most of the yard sale wandering around feeling sad about seeing their stuff go. I think this is pitch perfect for a young child watching this turmoil and I also think it was a reality for a lot of kids during the recession and, sadly, probably now too. That makes the book a good one for sharing in communities that were hit by the recession to open conversations and show kids they aren’t alone. It would also be a good one for communities like mine where we can build empathy and awareness that not everyone lives like they do.

Lauren Castillo also illustrated Nana in the City and I believe Nana is the woman who approaches Callie at the yard sale asking if she’s for sale. I have to say this is exactly the kind of insensitive comment my own daughter gets from older people (particularly women) when we go out. Comments that are meant to be funny but do not make sense to the child and make them feel bad or, worse, scared. I suspect this story has probably happened at countless yard sales and been very disturbing for the child while the adult leaves thinking they made a joke and is oblivious to the drama they have started. Nana, in this case, disappears completely from the sale on the very next page after dropping in to make her “joke”.

Despite my own personal feelings about the book I think it should be in all library collections.

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04

Jan
2016

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Only Child by Guojing

On 04, Jan 2016 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Only ChildThe Only Child written and illustrated by Guojing

From Goodreads: A little girl—lost and alone—follows a mysterious stag deep into the woods, and, like Alice down the rabbit hole, she finds herself in a strange and wondrous world. But… home and family are very far away. How will she get back there?

I have The Only Child listed as a picture book (and before it came in at the library for me I thought it was), but it’s more graphic novel than picture book. It’s rather long (by picture book standards) and the themes are fairly complex, but the book itself is large and it’s completely wordless. So just a heads up there. I think it will still sell well with graphic novel readers and I think younger readers (first and second grade) will be willing to pick it up and read through it too. There’s a lot for everyone here.

As with many books I was of two minds. Professionally speaking it’s a book that should be in collections. The illustrations are gorgeous. It’s written by and about an author of color so we need to support that.

The story is both beautiful and haunting. I think it really gets at some deep-seated fears of children of getting lost. But it then takes this whimsical turn and ends happily (actually it has a bittersweet ending). This idea and theme will be very relatable for children (and possibly contemplative adults). It’s such a magical story too that fantasy lovers will eat it up, but with just enough realism that your realistic fiction lovers will be willing to pick it up. And if you have animal lovers (who doesn’t?), give it to them too. They will particularly appreciate the artist’s ability to portray the bittersweetness of the ending on the face of the child and in how the panels cut back and forth and zoom in.

My other, personal, mind about the book?  I hated it. The author’s note talks about how the story is based on something that happened to the author when she was a child. She also goes on to talk about how lonely she was as an only child (she was product of China’s one-child policy) and I am so tired of this narrative about the poor, lonely, pathetic only child. It makes me so mad for several reasons. First, it fuels the fire with people who have vocal opinions about my choice to only have one child. Second, both my husband, myself, and many of our friends are only children AND WE WEREN’T LONELY OR WEIRD BECAUSE OF IT. In fact all of us enjoyed being only children and made sibling-like bonds with our friends. Third, and this is something I remember from being a kid and reading books with this underlying narrative, it makes only children feel inadequate. Particularly if you like being an Only.

I know, I know. This is not a criticism of the book. It’s me bringing my own baggage, which I why I say this book needs to be in library collections across the board. I just can’t read it without those undertones. Be aware that your only child patrons may not appreciate it either if they read the author’s note or pick up on the stance toward only children in it.

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