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Review

10

Jul
2017

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Chapter Book Review: Ellis and the Hidden Cave

On 10, Jul 2017 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Ellis and the Hidden CaveEllis and the Hidden Cave story by Cerece and Aryeh Rennie Murphy, written by Carol Kim, art by Gregory Garay

From Goodreads: An ancient civilization. An underwater world. And a new quest for the StoneKeeper! Ellis, Toro and Freddye are at it again in the 2nd book in the Ellis Monroe Series Early Reader Chapter Book! Join them as they explore a hidden world, face more nasty Bugabols and discover that there are many kinds of superpowers!

A solid sequel to Ellis and the Magic Mirror. These books do not have overly complex plots and are not long and that is perfect. I cannot emphasize how important this is for kids not ready to make the jump into older chapter books. In The Hidden Cave, Ellis, his sister Freddye, and his best friend Toro travel to India with their parents. When they arrive they head off to a newly discovered site of ruins that are rather mysterious. As the children head off to explore they find a secret entrance to an underwater world, opened to them because of Ellis’ power as a Stonekeeper. Once in the underwater world, Ellis, Freddye, and Toro encounter more bugabols (troll-like creatures) and Ellis discovers someone who can give him more information about being a Stonekeeper. While there Ellis learns a valuable lesson about the importance of kindness and empathy even when it is not being given to you.

While this book could stand alone, it will make a lot more sense if you’ve read the first book. There is a very quick recap that gives enough information, but it might take a stronger reader to really pick up on the parts that carry over. Ellis and Freddye, who are clearly African American, have well-educated university professor parents. This representation is particularly important to have in your collection if most of your books about black families show them in poverty, struggling, or working class.

If there were things I would have liked to see to make the book a little stronger in terms of diversity, I would say we need more specificity about where they are in India and we could see more influence of Indian culture and history. But you have to strike a balance between how much an emerging chapter book reader can take and get through with adding a lot more to the story. While I think that these additions would have made the book better for adults evaluating it, I am not sure it would have made it a better book for emerging readers. Kids need these quick and relatively easy books to grab their attention and encourage them to read more. As with the first book, it’s a thin paperback with no title on the spine making it a good candidate for facing out on the shelf or staying on display.

These books make a great addition to library and classroom collections that serve kids making the transition from easy readers to chapter books. They feature a diverse cast and fun fantasy plots that move quickly enough to keep early readers engaged while giving them a taste of the genre and what books can offer in terms of adventure. Parents and teachers will appreciate the subtle messages in the books that encourage readers to be brave and empathetic.

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