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Review

11

Jul
2017

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Little Red Riding Hood by Ki’el Ebon Ibrahim

On 11, Jul 2017 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Little Red Riding HoodUrbanToons presents: Little Red Riding Hood retold by Ki’el Ebon Ibrahim, illustrated by UrbanToons

From Goodreads: In this classical updated children’s story taken place in the beautiful land of Africa. Little Red Riding Hood is slightly cautious when her grandmother looks suspiciously like a sly Panther.

I came across UrbanToons on Instagram a couple months ago and was excited to see that they have published a number of retold fairy tales. Generally I have mixed feelings about fairy tales, both as a parent and as an educator. On the one hand they are referenced throughout our culture and do carry messages, on the other hand they tend to be Western European (the most common being Grimms from Germany) and are often watered down to be considered “suitable” for children today.

The UrbanToons Little Red Riding Hood is the story we are all familiar with and in terms of fairy tales, one that we don’t see censored too much (except for omitting the woodsman cutting the wolf open).  I was pleased by how much I enjoyed this one. While the description above says the book is set in Africa, the actual book specifies a country (Kenya) and a tribe (Maasai). I think this is incredibly important when setting books in Africa with African characters. Africa is not a country or a monolith and there is incredible variety in environment, culture, and people across the massive continent. Much like Debbie Reese encourages parents and educators to look for tribal specificity and nationhood in books with Native Nations, I think we need to do the same with African cultures and countries.

I loved that instead of a wolf Little Red is approached by a panther. The girl also has a name, not something she has in the original story as far as I know, which is refreshing because most fairy tale girls are pretty passive and have names that refer to their looks (Snow White) or their situation (Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella). I think that if you are going to share fairy tales with kids this would be a great retelling to have on hand. If you do a study of this particular tale or of fairy tales in general, read it along with the fantastic retelling Petite Rouge: A Cajun Red Riding Hood.

I definitely recommend adding this to your fairy/folk tale collection. That is a collection that desperately needs more diversity, either with retellings of with original tales respectfully told. It tends to center Western European fairy tales and would benefit from branching out. There is a lot of wonderful mythology and storytelling out there, why not bring some of it into the library and classroom?

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