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Review

12

Jul
2017

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: The Green Musician written by Mahvash Shahegh

On 12, Jul 2017 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Green MusicianThe Green Musician written by Mahvash Shahegh, illustrated by Clair Ewart

From Goodreads: If you had one chance to achieve your dream, what would you do? Long ago in Persia lived Barbad the musician, who dreamed of playing before the king. Blocked by a jealous rival, Barbad’s solution was simple: hide up in a tree and wait for the king to arrive!

This was a pretty gentle story. There weren’t really any great dramatics or adventures, but that was just fine. Barbad’s trick of befriending the gardener and hiding in a tree to play for the king is rather clever and even humorous.

Something was off in the timing of the story, though. There were pages with only one or two sentences and followed by pages with long paragraphs. The sentences would have long periods of time passing and then the paragraphs would focus in on a short event, which sounds like it would make sense, but felt more like it needed better editing and a little artistic license used to compress the story. It made the timeline harder to follow and felt unnecessarily disjointed.

I was also a bit turned off by the ending. Barbad is vying for a position held by another musician, Sarkash, and the king only keeps one musician in the palace. Admittedly Sarkash is a jerk. He prevents Barbad from playing for the king for a whole year, but he does it because it means he’ll be out of his job. The thing is, couldn’t the king have kept both? I know, I know that isn’t how things always work out. And I wouldn’t be surprised if the historical Barbad and Sarkash were a lot more nuanced than this simple story lets on. They’re here in this story to stand in as metaphors and lessons. Still. Barbad is not exactly a shining example either. He wants to be the king’s musician so he can live in the palace. Sure, he’ll send money back to his family but the book doesn’t say they’re in dire need, just that it was customary to send money home if you were making it. It makes his motive sound more selfish than selfless or artistically driven. He also thinks he’s better than Sarkash and when he finally gets his audience with the king he tattles on him for preventing him from seeing the king. One of the final scenes has Sarkash out on his ass (no, really! his donkey), riding away from the palace, turned out by the king. I couldn’t help but think, why didn’t Barbad choose to be a bigger person and not rat out Sarkash. It felt kind of petty. It also made me kind of hope that there’s a story somewhere where Barbad finds himself in the same position and realizing that maybe Sarkash wasn’t such a bad guy, just one who was afraid to lose his job. Maybe I’m reading way too much into this children’s book.

The illustrations are quite lovely with lots of bright birds and lush foliage. The contrast of the greens of the garden with the yellows and oranges of the sky and lighting are stunning. The lines of the illustration really draw your eye around the pages too. The text was long, but engaging enough. My own daughter sat through the story without complaint. I would still say it’s better for first or second grade over preschool. You could even read it up into third or fourth, although it might be a bit simplistic for older readers.

The story sounds, from the author’s note, like it is a well known Persian tale based on a historical character. For that reason alone I would consider purchasing this, but we have a surprising number of stories from Persian and Iran already so I think I will pass for now. If you are needing to add to or start a collection of Persian tales I would certainly consider this one.

 

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