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2018 November

21

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Water Walker by Joanne Robertston

On 21, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Water WalkerThe Water Walker written and illustrated by Joanne Robertson

From Goodreads: The determined story of an Ojibwe grandmother (nokomis), Josephine Mandamin, and her great love for nibi (water). Nokomis walks to raise awareness of our need to protect nibi for future generations and for all life on the planet. She, along with other women, men and youth, has walked around all the Great Lakes from the four salt waters, or oceans, to Lake Superior. The walks are full of challenges, and by her example she challenges us all to take up our responsibility to protect our water, the giver of life, and to protect our planet for all generations.

Based on a true story, The Water Walker, shares the story of Josephine Mandamin, a woman who was inspired by a prophecy to protect water. The book tracks her activism around water protection and the group of Water Walkers that she formed who join her on her many walks across North America.

I appreciate that the book shows simple activism. There are not organized marches here, no fundraisers, no political campaigns. Just a woman with a passion and a pair of shoes. Activism comes in many forms, but this is an accessible form for children. Just get out and do something to make a point and draw attention to an issue you’re passionate about. Don’t feel like you have to raise tons of money or get celebrities to endorse your cause.

It has the most adorable illustrations. They are bright and inviting and have a child-like feel to them that will really appeal to kids. To be clear, I don’t think a child could have drawn these, just the stylized form and watercolor/marker (?) medium make it feel like children’s drawings. Kids love to see books that mirror their art and are often inspired by them to make their own books and tell their own stories.

I love that Ojibwe words are just dropped into the text and not translated. This centers an Ojibwe-speaking audience instead of a non-Native audience. There are a lot of children’s books out there that are faux-Native, but this is an #ownvoices story that doesn’t pander to a white audience. There is a little glossary at the back of the book so if you couldn’t figure out what the word is from the context, there’s help. Also, it’s contemporary, not historical. It is vitally important that we show our students and children that Indigenous people are still here despite the best efforts of the U.S government (and previous colonial powers) to eradicate them.

While you could certainly use this book during Native American Heritage Month, it should be out all year long. Indigenous people are still here and they deserve representation in our classrooms and on our shelves all year long. Water is also a perennial issue with climate change, drought, Flint, Michigan, pollution, and myriad other issues that bring it to the forefront. You should be talking about these things with your children and your students. If you want to work it into a classroom study, use it with the water cycle. Put it out near the water table or with your water play station. Use it near Earth Day or when you study recycle/reduce/reuse. Pull it out when your kids are letting the faucet run too long while they wash their hands or brush their teeth. Or just use it to start a conversation about environmental justice. It’s a great way to get representation into science lessons and a great way to work environmental justice and social justice into lessons where we haven’t traditionally seen those topics. However you use it, put it on your shelf and get it into kids hands.

Pair this one with Young Water Protectors by Aslan Tudor.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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17

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Nonfiction Review: They She He Me: Free to Be! by Maya and Matthew Gonzalez

On 17, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

They She He MeThey She He Me: Free to Be! written and illustrated by Maya and Matthew Gonzalez

From the publisher: Pronouns sere as a familiar starting point for kids and grown-ups to expand ideas about gender and celebrate personal expression with fun imagery that provides a place to meet and play. 

I don’t normally read other reviews prior to writing my own, but I happened to read some for this book and I want to address something I saw in a couple of them. And that is the idea that this book must be read with a parent to help children understand it. I call b.s. on that idea. It can absolutely be used as a conversation starter between parent and child (or educator and child) and since many young children cannot read on their own it may be a shared reading experience. But, the idea that kids need an adult to explain the idea of gender and especially a non-binary idea of gender to them is very, very gender normative and promotes cisgender as both normal and dominant. I think most children understand that male and female and the roles “traditionally” assigned to those labels are very limiting and frequently inadequate in expressing how they feel about gender. I certainly remember the feeling of “not being a good girl” because I liked to run around with the boys and because I wasn’t into pink or princesses, while still having close girl friends and loving My Little Ponys and identifying at cisgender female. Kids understand that a gender binary is too limiting, even if they identify as cisgender and this book gives them validation that they are right about that and also gives them the language they can use to express that.

Okay, with that out of the way, this is wonderful little book to have on your shelves. It’s very simple in it’s execution, which actually makes it work well as a picture book and an easy reader. Just a quick note, “they”, “she”, “he”, “me”, “we”, “to” and “be” are all sight words (words kids need to memorize on sight instead of sounding out each and every time they encounter them in a text). Very young kids will enjoy reading through this and looking at the people and even older children will be captivated by the ideas shown here (my seven year old still likes to read this one).

Maya’s illustrations are always so charming. Happy people and children with flushed cheeks, she presents a mix of skin colors, clothing, ability, and hair. Babies and toddlers, who love faces, will enjoy looking at the pictures, while young kids will enjoy the added experience of seeing the pronouns the people identify with below them. If you can read this to babies and toddlers all the better, as it will counteract some (but by no means all) of the societal pressure to conform to narrow ideas of male and female.

This is definitely one to have in your home and on your library shelves. Might you get push back from parents and patrons? Yes. But don’t let that deter you. Kids who don’t conform to the male-female binary deserve and need to see themselves in our books. We also need to give kids the vocabulary to describe gender. Please read my post about soft censoring books for more on the insidious nature of caving to the pressure of possible complaints.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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07

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: K is for Kahlo by Dr. Tamara Pizzoli

On 07, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

K is for KahloK is for Kahlo written by Dr. Tamara Pizzoli, pictures by Howell Edwards Creative

From Goodreads: K is for Kahlo is an artistic tour of the alphabet featuring notable artists from all around the globe. From painters to sculptors to muralists to architects, explore the creativity of some of the most influential artists in this vibrant and unique take on the abc’s.

Normally I’m a little confused by ABC books. What exactly is their purpose? Their content seems to be aimed at the three and under set, kids who aren’t really learning letters yet per se. Add to this that a lot of them use words that do not correctly represent the sound the letter makes (e.g. using owl for “o” or giraffe for “g”), so they’re not particularly helpful even if a kid was learning their letters. And by the time kids are actually learning their ABCs to employ in the process of reading, they’re past the simplicity of an ABC book.

K is for Kahlo, on the other hand, turns the ABC book format on it’s head. Pizzoli, of Tallulah brilliance, has employed the ABC form in a way that makes perfect sense. She takes the form and gives it function. Each letter is associated with an artist and features the letter clearly written and a stylized image of their face. The illustrations are lovely and simple and make this an excellent choice to share with babies and toddlers who love to look at faces. My seven month old was quite captivated by it and kept chuckling as we turned the pages and gazed at the new faces (she also tried to eat it, so I wish this came in a board book format).

There is a great mix of artists here (male, female, contemporary, old masters, a variety of national origins), meaning it’s not just a list of old Eurpopean white dudes. There’s even a nod to Pizzoli’s friend and artist Elena Tommasi-Ferroni who has illustrated a few of Pizzol’s books include the beautiful Fatou and the Kora. Which makes this perfect for older children, it can spark conversations about all these different artists. Blessedly Pizzoli has included a two-page spread at the back that gives the full name, dates, and one or two sentence description of each artist. “B is for Basquiat” led my seven year old to pull out our copy of Radiant Child and of course a quick Google search showed various pieces by each of the artists she was curious about.

This is yet another book that’s appropriate for classroom libraries, school libraries, home libraries, and public libraries alike. I could see classrooms using this book in an art center or even with a self-portrait project or station. For small collections skip the commercialized and terrible ABC books and get one or two that open up conversation around the content and not the letters.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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