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2020 February

24

Feb
2020

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Testing Jitters by Alisha Chenevert

On 24, Feb 2020 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Testing Jitters written by Alisha Chenevert, illustrated by Hatice Bayramoglu

On the cover of the picture book is a classroom. A variety of children are sitting at desks with papers in front of them and pencils in hand. In the center of the picture is a girl with braided pigtails, a bright pink shirt, and brown skin.
Image descritpion: On the cover of the picture book is a classroom. A variety of children are sitting at desks with papers in front of them and pencils in hand. In the center of the picture is a girl with braided pigtails, a bright pink shirt, and brown skin.

From Goodreads: Read along as a brilliant young lady by the name of Mya shares her struggles of testing anxiety. As Mya prepares for bed the night before a big test, she finds herself unable to fall asleep. Suddenly, a genie appears to grant her ten wishes which includes a journey through some of Mya’s favorite adventures. Throughout her journey, Mya learns to focus on positive thoughts that bring her joy and help her to relax as she prepares for a test. She awakes to find that she no longer has testing jitters and that all is well.

I once read an article that encouraged teachers to call tests “Zimbabwes” because that word was silly and less threatening than the word “test”. Besides being kind of racist for calling the name of a country in Africa silly and implying that it isn’t threatening, this isn’t a particularly useful strategy for reducing anxiety since kids aren’t stupid. They know a test is a test no matter what you call it and for those kids who get performance anxiety or testing jitters, they need REAL strategies for focusing their minds and working with their anxiety.

There are also studies about how simply mentioning or implying that certain groups are not good at a subject (such as saying women aren’t good at math) prior to administering a test impacts performance in a measurable way. All of which to say is, testing anxiety is real and some kids need extra help. Tests are something we all have to suffer through even in the adult world (hello, DMV) so working on the anxiety as a child can help kids become successful, fully functioning adults.

In Testing Jitters Mya is nervous about a big test at school the next day. Her mom tries to soothe her and offers words of encouragement as well as to make a good breakfast in the morning, but she still goes to bed worried. In her dreams that night she is met by Gina, a genie. Together the two girls talk about things that bring Mya joy. They dance, swing, and visit the beach. Gina teaches Mya that she can calm herself by thinking of her favorite activities and places as well as taking deep breaths and believing in herself. She wakes up refreshed and takes her mom up on a hearty breakfast.

This is definitely a book for school libraries as well as classroom collections that teachers can pull out for working with anxious kiddos. Parents can work with kids to develop a list of strategies to try out for calming nerves- deep breaths, talking back to the anxious voice, finding some favorite places to visit to center themselves, etc. It’s helpful to see Mya do these things and find comfort in them as she sits down to take her big test. Testing anxiety (and honestly anxiety in general) is not a topic I see tackled a whole lot in kidlit, so Testing Jitters is a great addition to book shelves.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links)

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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22

Feb
2020

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Landon’s Lemonade Stand by Randy Williams

On 22, Feb 2020 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Landon’s Lemonade Stand written by Randy Williams, illustrated by Mark “mas” Stewart

In the center foreground, a little boy with short dreadlocks holds up a red cup of lemonade in one hand and flyer advertising his lemonade stand in the other. Behind him is a shiny, red, new bike and a table with a sign for his lemonade stand. Across the top is the title of the book with lemons on either side in the corners.
Image description: In the center foreground, a little boy with short dreadlocks holds up a red cup of lemonade in one hand and flyer advertising his lemonade stand in the other. Behind him is a shiny, red, new bike and a table with a sign for his lemonade stand. Across the top is the title of the book with lemons on either side in the corners.

From Goodreads: Landon’s Lemonade Stand is about a young African American child who learns to be an entrepreneur by opening a lemonade stand to earn money for a brand new RBG Speedster bicycle. Author Randy Williams inspires young girls and boys alike with messages of leadership and financial responsibility while encouraging children to seek entrepreneurship at a young age.

Watching TV one morning Landon sees an ad for a new bike and decides he really, really wants it. His parents see an opportunity to have Landon take on the responsibility of getting what he wants for himself and suggest a lemonade stand. From there they support him through the process of getting it up and running and teaching him some basic business practices.

The pacing in this story was excellent. It starts with Landon seeing the bike on TV and has him run to his parents asking for it. Then the story takes us through the steps for getting his lemonade stand up and running and then shows resolution of his initial desire to get a bike. Nothing in the story drags, feels overly expository, or gets bogged down with too much detail. Williams keeps reader interest through the whole story while also giving them a blueprint for how to start up their own lemonade stand.

As a mom, I have to say I love the expressions on Landon’s mom’s face. Especially when they’re in the grocery store getting supplies. She’s making hard eye contact and raising an eyebrow. Landon is busy assuring her he has a good grip on what he needs and a complete list of supplies and she’s just being doubly sure, because she will not be driving back for forgotten items, so help her God. All the illustrations have a fun comic book style that matches the enthusiasm and lightness of the story.

With warmer weather heading our way in the Northern Hemisphere, this is sure to inspire kids to get out there and make lemonade. Libraries should have this book on their shelves during summer months to encourage all young entrepreneurs out there. Schools with summer programs and access to their libraries should definitely have this and even if the library is closed over the summer have it to inspire kids in April and May.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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17

Feb
2020

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: My Grandma Is a Lady by Jalissa B. Pollard

On 17, Feb 2020 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

My Grandma Is a Lady written by Jalissa B. Pollard, illustrated by Hatice Bayramoglu

Picture of the cover of the book. It features a grandmother with light brown skin wearing a white jacket and short white veil over her gray hair. She is holding a makeup compact and is raising a powder puff up to her cheek. She is looking back at her granddaughter who is sitting on her bed in a pink dress holding a doll. On the vanity table is a yellow vase of purple flowers and the grandmother's glasses.
Image description: Picture of the cover of the book. It features a grandmother with light brown skin wearing a white jacket and short white veil over her gray hair. She is holding a makeup compact and is raising a powder puff up to her cheek. She is looking back at her granddaughter who is sitting on her bed in a pink dress holding a doll. On the vanity table is a yellow vase of purple flowers and the grandmother’s glasses.

From Goodreads: My Grandma is a Lady is about a young African American girl that chronicles her memories of her grandmother’s participation and membership in the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Knights of Peter Claver, a historically black lay organization of Catholics. Representation matters. This story resonates with many children of the Catholic faith worldwide.

My Grandma Is a Lady is a lovely ode to religious grandmas everywhere, specifically Catholic grandmas. The little girl we see on the cover tells us about the things her grandmother does. She dresses in white every second Sunday, she reminds the girl of her mother’s birthday, she prays rosary in the park with her lady friends in the Fall. The girl concludes that she hopes to be like her grandmother one day, a faithful lady.

The illustrations are bight and airy lending the book a lightness despite how austere and dower church and church ladies are often depicted. Clearly the author and the girl in the book see the grandmother’s religion and faith as very positive things. Christianity and religion doesn’t get a lot of press in mainstream children’s publishing and the religious presses tend to have heavy-handed, moralizing books for kids. It’s refreshing to see this depiction of religion and a religious family member where it is clearly a love letter to a beloved grandmother, rather than a hard sell on converting kids. And I think a lot of folks have grandmothers and grandparents that take great pride in religion, so they get to see their favorite family members reflected in a positive way here.

For those readers concerned by the word lady, don’t let it hang you up too much if you’re looking for a book celebrating grandmas. While the grandmother is a lady, the things that make her a lady are not overly feminine or gendered. They seem to be things that make her more religious and faithful.

It isn’t explicit in the story whether or not the little girl narrating is living with her grandmother or whether her mother may be dead. It reminded me of the book Sunday Shopping where the little girl lives with her grandmother because her mother is in the military, although it’s ambiguous whether the mother is simply deployed or dead. I personally think the ambiguity makes it more relatable for a wider variety of families, but I also imagine some families are looking for less ambiguity.

Libraries situated in religious communities would be well advised to get a copy of this on their shelves. Ditto classrooms and schools with large religious communities. If religion is less of a community value, but you do celebrate grandparents, then this book is still highly recommended.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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17

Feb
2020

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Shapes with Logan by Lorraine O’Garro

On 17, Feb 2020 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

A white cover features the title across the top in large red letters shadowed by a yellow outline. Logan, a little black boy with a flat top, khaki shorts, tennis shoes, green long sleeve shirt and a maroon puffy vest marches at the front of a line of shape with legs. He is followed by a red square, green oval, and yellow triangle.
Image description: A white cover features the title across the top in large red letters shadowed by a yellow outline. Logan, a little black boy with a flat top, khaki shorts, tennis shoes, green long sleeve shirt and a maroon puffy vest marches at the front of a line of shapes with legs. He is followed by a red square, green oval, and yellow triangle.

Shapes with Logan written by Lorraine O’Garro, illustrated by Katlego Kgabale

From Goodreads: Join Logan as he teaches you the shapes in the world around us. This book presents shapes like you’ve never seen them before. Perfect for young learners and curious minds. Logan is the newest character to join Bella in her world adventures.

Author Lorraine O’Garro and illustrator Katlego Kgabale are back, building on Numbers with Bella and The Alphabet with Bella. They have brought us another wonderful concept book with little Logan teaching readers to identify shapes. Bella makes some appearances too!

The simplicity of these books belies how good they are. Each shape is given a two-page spread. On the left the name of the shape is written in large, friendly text. Hello, print awareness for our pre-readers! Below each word is the actual shape. On the right-hand side Logan can be seen discovering or interacting with the shape in real life. For example, “rectangle” shows Logan and Bella floating in a rectangular pool and “hexagon” shows Logan in beekeeping get up (I do love bees) looking at a close-up of honey comb. Below each illustration is the word for the object we’re looking at, which of course draws the readers’ attention to the shape found in the world.

I appreciate that the list of shapes Logan shows readers does not include ridiculously useless shapes like parallelogram (try teaching a three year old to say that, let alone identify one in real life), rhombus (just call it a kite or a diamond), or whatever you call a nine-sided shape (I have gotten through all these years without knowing so clearly it’s not essential). It is also very simply, but intentionally, illustrated. Concept books are wonderful as they help kids and caregivers learn to categorize the world around them, identify and discuss what they are seeing, and generally give kids language. But let’s not forget that concept books are for some of our youngest readers. So many of them over complicate things for young readers and feel like they are more for the adults reading the books than the children they should be for. This is not the case with the Logan and Bella books. They are pitch perfect for this age group.

I know there are lots of concept books out there to choose from, but beyond thoughtful inclusions and sweet illustrations, the Bella and Logan concept books feature Black kids. If you’re going to have a collection of concept books, be sure it is diverse and include Shapes with Logan.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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