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07

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: K is for Kahlo by Dr. Tamara Pizzoli

On 07, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

K is for KahloK is for Kahlo written by Dr. Tamara Pizzoli, pictures by Howell Edwards Creative

From Goodreads: K is for Kahlo is an artistic tour of the alphabet featuring notable artists from all around the globe. From painters to sculptors to muralists to architects, explore the creativity of some of the most influential artists in this vibrant and unique take on the abc’s.

Normally I’m a little confused by ABC books. What exactly is their purpose? Their content seems to be aimed at the three and under set, kids who aren’t really learning letters yet per se. Add to this that a lot of them use words that do not correctly represent the sound the letter makes (e.g. using owl for “o” or giraffe for “g”), so they’re not particularly helpful even if a kid was learning their letters. And by the time kids are actually learning their ABCs to employ in the process of reading, they’re past the simplicity of an ABC book.

K is for Kahlo, on the other hand, turns the ABC book format on it’s head. Pizzoli, of Tallulah brilliance, has employed the ABC form in a way that makes perfect sense. She takes the form and gives it function. Each letter is associated with an artist and features the letter clearly written and a stylized image of their face. The illustrations are lovely and simple and make this an excellent choice to share with babies and toddlers who love to look at faces. My seven month old was quite captivated by it and kept chuckling as we turned the pages and gazed at the new faces (she also tried to eat it, so I wish this came in a board book format).

There is a great mix of artists here (male, female, contemporary, old masters, a variety of national origins), meaning it’s not just a list of old Eurpopean white dudes. There’s even a nod to Pizzoli’s friend and artist Elena Tommasi-Ferroni who has illustrated a few of Pizzol’s books include the beautiful Fatou and the Kora. Which makes this perfect for older children, it can spark conversations about all these different artists. Blessedly Pizzoli has included a two-page spread at the back that gives the full name, dates, and one or two sentence description of each artist. “B is for Basquiat” led my seven year old to pull out our copy of Radiant Child and of course a quick Google search showed various pieces by each of the artists she was curious about.

This is yet another book that’s appropriate for classroom libraries, school libraries, home libraries, and public libraries alike. I could see classrooms using this book in an art center or even with a self-portrait project or station. For small collections skip the commercialized and terrible ABC books and get one or two that open up conversation around the content and not the letters.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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24

Oct
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Chapter Book Review: The Ghosts in the Castle by Zetta Elliott

On 24, Oct 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Ghosts in the CastleThe Ghosts in the Castle by Zetta Elliott

From Goodreads: Zaria has dreamed of England for as long as she can remember—according to the novels she’s read, everything magical happens there! When her grandfather suffers a stroke, Zaria and her mother head to London to help care for him. Zaria reads fantastic tales to her grandfather every afternoon, and she’s thrilled to discover that her cousin Winston shares her love of wands, wizards, and mythical creatures. But Zaria soon finds that life in London is actually quite ordinary—until she goes on a day trip to nearby Windsor Castle. There Zaria meets two extraordinary ghosts who need help finding their way back to the African continent they once called home.

My daughter is loving this series so much. We quickly read through the first three books at bedtime and will be getting the fourth soon. This one was especially timely because we read it just at the time of the royal wedding (something we were not at all keeping up on, except that it was on the news) and I was able to point out the connection of Windsor Castle to her. It made finding pictures of it really easy.

That being said, this has nothing to do with a wedding or British royalty. Not really. I absolutely loved getting to meet Zaria, Tariq’s sister from the first book. She’s a really awesome kid and very kind. Zaria takes to her nerdy, smart, and slightly awkward cousin Winston and the two have an experience of a lifetime. The ghosts make this a great read for October, but the puzzle and history make it an interesting read for any time of the year.

I shouldn’t be, but I am always surprised at how well Elliott can jump between types of children’s literature. It’s certainly something other authors are not nearly so successful with. Here Elliott has written a chapter book that most fourth and even some third graders should be able to tackle. I recall the the first two books in the series being slightly easier and shorter than this one which is perfect. As kids improve through reading the series levels up with them. It also makes for a great read aloud (they all do, actually). The plot isn’t overly complicated and the books aren’t too long so it holds the interest and imagination of kids just learning to listen to chapter books.

I know kids love those Magic Tree House books, but they are awful- inaccurate history, THE WORST dialog ever, insipid characters. If you are looking for somewhere to start with read alouds for your kids or students this is a great series. You will enjoy them as much as your kids. They’re full of likable characters, interesting and important history, and magic. If you’re a librarian looking to add to your chapter book collection, please, please, please add these. It’s okay to have those tedious chapter books written for reading practice (although the inaccurate history is issue), but let’s diversify those shelves in terms of the representation AND the writing quality.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

 

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18

Oct
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Gender Wheel by Maya Christina Gonzalez

On 18, Oct 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Gender WheelThe Gender Wheel: A Story About Bodies and Gender written and illustrated by Matthew and Maya Christina Gonzalez

From Goodreads: This body positive book is a powerful opportunity for a supportive adult and child to see a wide range of bodies, understand the origins of the current binary gender system, how we can learn from nature to see the truth that has always existed and revision a new story that includes room for all bodies and genders. The Gender Wheel offers a queer centric, holistic framework of radical gender inclusion in a kid-friendly way for the budding activists who will change our world. This is our world!

You can’t claim to want to diversify your shelves if you aren’t also including books about gender diversity. Fortunately there are a few good resources out there to help you with that, including this gem from Maya Gonzalez and Reflection Press.

Let’s be clear sexuality and gender are NOT the same. The book does talk about the outside and inside of bodies, but sexuality is not a part of this discussion.* Gonzalez does a phenomenal job explaining in child-friendly and appropriate language that people and bodies come in all different forms. She begins by decolonizing the idea of gender. She very bluntly calls out the history of European colonization that set up the damaging girl-boy binary of gender. She addresses it, notes that it is just plain wrong, and then moves on to affirm and explain that gender is fluid, infinite, and natural using a circle.

Gonzalez has published two different versions of this text, one with naked bodies and one with clothed bodies.She has drawn some children with bodies that look ambiguous and that have parts that match what we think of as male and female but aren’t. If at all possible, include the one with naked bodies on your shelves. Nakedness is not something to be ashamed of or feared and teaching children to be ashamed of, to hate, and be ignorant of naked bodies, especially their own, does them a major disservice. DO NOT let this fall into some sort of cisgendered obsession with body parts, but know it can help kids grasp these concepts, especially younger kids who need more concrete explanations. I know for my own daughter it was helpful to understand that there is a lot of in between with genitalia. That being said, plenty of schools may not be comfortable or able to have naked kids on their shelves, so you will have to take that into consideration.

In addition to the outside circle which deals with how a body looks and feels on the outside, Gonzalez also includes an inner wheel which addresses both inside parts (body parts that can’t be seen) and how a person feels about their gender and identifies themselves. This includes pronouns and labels. The two wheels can move separately so that the body does not always match the same pronoun, label, or feeling/identity. This is brilliant. Children will grasp this concept. For young audiences you can hop over to the Reflection Press website and download the wheel from their free resources and actually make it to use as a prop.

There is one more VERY important piece to this book that must be mentioned. The Gender Wheel is part of a larger set or series that includes a wonderful simple, easy reader and a workbook. Gonzalez has developed a curriculum around this that would be wonderful for schools and libraries to have available for their teachers and families. But her work was stolen by some other authors who are published by a larger publishing house. You can and should read about this here on Gonzalez’ blog. BUT BE SURE TO SUPPORT HER AND HER WORK BY PURCHASING THIS BOOK AND SERIES AND NOT THE PLAGIARIZED ONE.

So, to diversify your bookshelves look to The Gender Wheel and the Gender Now curriculum.

*To be clear, you need books that deal with sexuality on your shelves too and it also needs to be an ongoing discussion. It can also be intertwined with gender, but for this book it is not. Sexuality can be a hard sell in libraries so don’t shy away from this book on account of that. But if you are shying away from books that tackle potentially controversial topics unpack that feeling and go read my post about how that kind of thought process upholds white supremacy culture.

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11

Oct
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Nonfiction Review: Young Water Protectors by Aslan Tudor

On 11, Oct 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Young Water ProtectorsYoung Water Protectors: A Story About Standing Rock written by Aslan Tudor, co-written by Kelly Tudor

From Goodreads: At the not-so-tender age of 8, Aslan arrived in North Dakota to help stop a pipeline. A few months later he returned – and saw the whole world watching. Read about his inspiring experiences in the Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. Learn about what exactly happened there, and why. Be inspired by Aslan’s story of the daily life of Standing Rock’s young water protectors. Mni Wiconi … Water is Life

I picked up a copy of this book to read on Indigenous People’s Day with my own daughter, but felt it warranted a review here. When I was working in my last library I spent a lot of time combing through the collection that featured nonfiction titles on Native Nations. I weeded old, racist, and inaccurate titles and added a lot of titles that came recommended by Native/Indigenous scholars and librarians or were written by Native/Indigenous authors. This was a particularly important project to me because so many grades in elementary school study Native Americans, either during Native American Heritage Month, with units of study like the California Mission System (ugh), the Gold Rush (ugh, again), or as part of an attempt to incorporate diversity into their curriculums (problematic at best).

One of the most difficult pieces of Native American culture to incorporate and find reflected in kidlit was the fact that Native Americans are still very much alive and here. So. Many. Books relegate them to a sad, wimpy past and that narrative, besides being dangerous, is patently untrue. Children need to see that Native Nations are sovereign and alive and vibrant. There is Jingle Dancer, Powwow Summer, and a handful of others, but they weren’t easy to discover.

I think Standing Rock and the #NoDAPL protest was a very powerful movement and moment to bring that current history (current event?) into the classroom, but I suspect that most teachers were either not aware of it or were fearful of being “too political”. Young Water Protectors, however, allows teachers, parents, and librarians to open a discussion with their students, children, and patrons. Aslan Tudor is a ten year old boy who was eight when he and his family went to the Oceti Sakowin Camp. This is an incredible resource for everyone. Not only does it introduce the idea of sovereignty, it tackles the fact that the land (the whole US, but specifically the Dakotas) were stolen from the people who lived by white colonizers. It also does a really great job of sharing history that led up to the protest, the issues at hand, and Tudor’s personal experience at the camp. Add to this that it can be used to inspire budding authors to pen their own stories of resistance. It can be used in conjunction with units on Native Nations, environmentalism, and social justice.

For those of you who are fearful of being “too political” I suggest you look long and hard at that statement and the privilege it carries. The book does a good job of skirting around finger pointing, while still calling out the politics and economics that allowed the pipeline to happen. The photographs are quite nice and illustrate the subject well. The book is also an #ownvoices, as Tudor is a citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe. Be sure to add this to your shelves and collections. Pair it with The Water Walker by Joanne Robertson which I will be reviewing soon.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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28

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Look for Me written by Frank Minikon, illustrated by Mark “Mas” Stewart

On 28, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Look for MeLook for Me: A Snippet in the Life of Marcus Garvey written by Frank Minikon, illustrated by Mark “Mas” Stewart

From Goodreads: Young Marcus Garvey was a person with a big dream. He dreamed of gathering people all across the globe so they could come together and work collectively using each other’s strengths. Garvey created a newspaper company, a shipping company, and several organizations with the idea that we could progress as a people and take care of each other like a big family. He was educated, organized, and dedicated. In this story you’ll read about his message, and how he inspired people all across the globe. Marcus Mosiah Garvey was a man of the people and, despite the many challenges of life, he swirled around the globe with the energy of a whirlwind saying to one and to all: “Look for Me.”

I am always fascinated by people from the 1920s, 30s and 40s. From the ones I’ve read about they seem to have been able to just go out and get jobs doing things. Exciting things. Like writing for newspapers, starting companies, jumping from field to field. And I can’t quite figure out if that’s because they were just braver than me, or if it was just easier for them. Like maybe regulations weren’t as strict and expectations weren’t so narrow?

Marcus Garvey is a great example of this. He traveled around and worked as an editor for newspapers in Central America. He organized and started a shipping company that transported goods. He was a speaker in London. Sure, he may not have gotten rich off any of these careers, but you can’t just walk into a newspaper office these days and be an editor. No one is about to have you come speak to their organization without major credentials and even with crowdfunding I think you’d be hard pressed to start in import/export company.

Look For Me is the latest title in the “Snippet in the Life” series from publisher Melanin Origins. It’s also the longest and probably most like a traditional biography of all the books thus far. From the book we learn where he was born and several of the careers he had. While other books in the series have shared similar information, such as Louisiana Belle, in this one it feels much more like a chronological, non fiction, accounting of Garvey’s life. It also talks about his legacy and the final pages feature a timeline of Garvey’s life with his picture.

Despite this, the book is still geared toward younger audiences. While it’s longer than the others, it’s still brief. The actual text doesn’t include any dates or specifics that would be meaningless for small children. But the list in the back of the book is perfect for for parents or teachers who want to extend the learning and history lesson. The illustrations feature more modern looking children which, as I’ve said before with this series, draws kids in. And again, the series focuses on a historic black figure that was very important, but rarely shows up in children’s literature.

Another solid addition to the series. Be sure to round out your collection with it.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

The book releases on December 1st. I will link here when it does so you can order your own copy.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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21

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Not All Superheroes Wear Capes by Alecia R. Heffner

On 21, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

SuperheroesNot All Superheroes Wear Capes written by Alecia R. Heffner

From Goodreads: Not All Superheroes Wear Capes is a children’s book designed to teach African American students the opportunities available to them in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers. This inspiring book combines positive images of African Americans engaging in exciting careers with a powerful message of how these individuals help others in their daily life.

Kids always love superhero books and this one will give some new superheroes to admire. Not All Superheroes Wear Capes showcases everyday heroes from doctors to dentists to chemists. I love that this book covers STEM careers. I love that it shows women in some of these careers (and not just as a nurse). And I love that it’s a really different mix of STEM professions. There is a chiropractor, a nurse practitioner, and a pharmacist, as well as your typical doctor.

 

In calling these doctors and scientists superheroes, I think the book really encourages children to look around at the real people in their lives doing extraordinary things in ordinary circumstances. They’ve all been to a doctor or a gotten a shot or visited the dentist. Normally those experiences are mundane (or menacing, depending on how they feel about shots), but Not All Superheroes nudges kids to realize that their doctors and nurses have worked hard and are committed to helping people, like them, and that makes them super.

While all children can be inspired by the book, all the characters are black and will speak directly to children of color, showing them they can be these things. That kind of representation, while on the rise, is still rare. There are even few nods to HBCUs in some of the illustrations. The text also emphasizes the hard work ahead of kids who may want to pursue a career in a STEM field, but assures them it’s within reach.

The one issue you might run into with it is length. It covers a lot of territory and might need to be split into more than one reading for your youngest storytime patrons. But it’s a trade off, right? You wouldn’t get all these great careers covered if you don’t have a longer book. The book would be perfect on a classroom shelf or in a school library, but public libraries would also do well to ensure the representation seen in this book is included on their shelves too. Not to mention it would make a great book to share at a superhero themed storytime.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

 

 

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05

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

YA Review: Mother of the Sea by Zetta Elliott

On 05, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Mother of the SeaMother of the Sea written by Zetta Elliott

From Goodreads: When her village is raided, a teenage girl finds herself on a brutal journey to the coast of Africa and across the Atlantic. Her only comfort is a small child who clings to her for protection. But once they board the slave ship, the child reveals her rebellious nature and warns that her mother—a fierce warrior—is coming to claim them all.

While I love all books by Zetta Elliott, the cover alone on this one would have convinced me to buy it if I hadn’t known who she was. It is gorgeous. You will draw readers in just by placing it cover out on the shelf (you do do that, right?).

This is the kind of book that should be read in history classes and English classes. Elliott is a world class author and her language is beautiful. There is no reason not to study the book from that angle. There is also an important perspective and piece of history that is not typically studied in social studies curriculums. The slave trade is mentioned in history class, but in a very clinical, sterile kind of way. A way that ignores the humanity of the people captured and forcibly brought here. That’s probably to make white students, families, teachers, and text book authors more comfortable with their white guilt, but it is neither fair nor wise. White students need to look at their own complicity in a system that was built on that trade and students of color, particularly black students, need to see people like them in books depicted as human. Elliott does that here in a way that we don’t often see in traditional publishing or school.

The subject matter is difficult here and rape is referenced in an oblique way. Mother of the Sea brought to mind two other books, one a picture book and the other another YA novel. In the Time of the Drums by Kim Siegelson deals with slaves drawn into the water to return home. Sharon Draper’s Copper Sun begins in the same brutal way with the Middle Passage.

While you could hand this to just about anyone who enjoys historical novels or magical realism, Mother of the Sea is perfect for reluctant readers. Suspense, beautiful language that draws you in, short, and captivating readers won’t want to put it down. High school libraries or libraries with high school age populations absolutely must have this on their shelves. These stories are important and Elliott is a top-notch writer. While a brutal story, she lulls you with the beauty of her words and her craft as a storyteller. Middle school libraries, well, your mileage will vary. I personally don’t see a problem with having this on your shelves. Most middle school American history classes discuss slavery and the slave trade, so clearly it isn’t a taboo subject (and it shouldn’t be anyway, preserving innocence of students only protects white privileged students, no one else). But I also recognize that it could be an uphill battle if this book gets challenged by a disgruntled parent. You as a librarian will have to make that call.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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03

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Rumplepimple by Suzanne DeWitt Hall

On 03, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

RumplepimpleRumplepimple written by Suzanne DeWitt Hall, illustrated by Kevin Scott Gierman

From Goodreads: Life isn’t easy when your big sister is an annoying cat and your moms can’t understand a word you say. But that doesn’t stop Rumplepimple from saving the day in a most unusual way. Find out how a car ride transforms a naughty terrier into a grocery store hero.

I bought this earlier in the year to put in my Read-T0-A-Dog basket in the library. I bought my own copy a week or two ago and my daughter has been asking to read it frequenly ever since.

I love that this book has a lot to talk about in it. The most obvious is how Rumplepimple stands up to a bully. When a little boy has snatched his sister’s blanket from her in the grocery store, Rumplepimple hears her cry and rushes in to give the blanket back. When I read this with my daughter we talked about how Rumplepimple saved the day and did a good thing by intervening when something wrong was happening.

Of course this is not what his mom sees. After he slips out the car door and rushes into the store he loses his mom. She ultimately finds him peering in the meat department case licking his lips and assumes he has been up to no good. This is also a great conversation starter about doing the right thing even when no one is looking and even if you don’t get recognized for it. It can also lead to discussing doing the right thing even if you get in trouble for it.

While all this is well and good, my daughter and students loved it because Rumplepimple is a cute dog. The story sounds like the thoughts that go through a dog’s head and are quite funny. Or at least what I imagine does. :) I love the nod to The Farside comics with the “Blah, blah, blah, Rumplepimple” line when he’s being scolded in the car after being recaptured.

I have a few design issues, but they’re minor and neither my students nor my daughter noticed them. I wish more of the illustrations filled the page instead of the spot illustrations. There’s a lot of white space in the book and it feels sparse. I think it could have been a couple pages shorter too, but again it’s all minor.

If you want a cute dog story (don’t all kids?), then this book is well worth adding to your collection. It’s paperback so get the book tape out. Rumplepimple has two moms and, while their relationship is not specified, I think it’s implied that they are in a relationship. This is a great book to get some incidental diversity into your storytimes and collections!

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31

Aug
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Chapter Book: The Hijab Boutique by Michelle Kahn

On 31, Aug 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Hijab BoutiqueThe Hijab Boutique written by Michelle Kahn

From Goodreads: Farah enjoyed her private girls’ school and fun with her friends. Then an assignment meant she had to talk about her mother for “International Woman’s Day” in front of the whole class. Compared to her friends’ glamorous actress, make-up artist, and tap-dancing mothers, what can her modest mother possibly have that is worth sharing with her classmates? To Farah’s surprise, her mother was quite the business woman before putting her career on hold to care for her daughter.

I love the mother-daughter relationship here. What kid hasn’t looked at their parent and been only able to see a boring/uncool/conventional person, especially when compared to the parents of your peers. Farrah isn’t necessarily embarrassed by her mom, nor does she think the other girls in her class have better parents, but her mother seems so other to her for a time. Thankfully the book shows how that is not the case as Farrah begins to see her mother build a new life for them.

Which leads me to the other part of the book I thought made it stand out. The theme of letting go. Farrah’s father was killed in a drunk driving accident several years before the book takes place. She and her mother have been financially and emotionally stable since then, but they are still stuck in the past to some extent. Farrah’s mother, unbeknownst to Farrah, has decided that while they loved the life they had in their expensive, prestigious neighborhood it’s time for her to let go of that and make a new life of meaning for herself and her daughter. She and Farrah talk about this and agree that they aren’t forgetting her father, they are letting go and moving on in a very healthy way.

In some ways this book may have a hard time finding its place on library shelves, but not in the collection. It’s slim and unassuming, but the language, particularly the vocabulary, make this higher level. My first instinct was to consider it a chapter book and it certainly could be a good transition from the chapter book section into the middle grade section. But it would also be at home in the middle grade section based on the age of the characters and vocabulary. Just be sure it doesn’t get lost on the shelf. I think the author must be Canadian? Some of the slang sounds Canadian despite the Los Angeles setting.

This book should be on your shelves despite it being tricky to categorize, though. It shows a beautiful mother-daughter relationship between two strong Muslim women. It’s also wonderful to see a book about hijab and women who wear hijab that isn’t focused on explaining the religious aspect of it. Sure, hijab has to do with faith, but Muslim girls (and boys!) know this already. They don’t need convincing that women who choose to wear it for any reason are not necessarily oppressed. It feels like a lot of those books exist to explain hijab to non-Muslim audiences and make them more comfortable, but books like this and My Own Special Way are clearly for families who are Muslim and will take it in stride or for families who don’t feel like they need to have other people’s religious choices defended so they can accept them.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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29

Aug
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: A Hand to Hold by Zetta Elliott

On 29, Aug 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Hand to HoldA Hand to Hold written by Zetta Elliott, illustrated by Purple Wong

From Goodreads: Can you hold onto someone with your heart instead of your hand? When it’s time to start school, a little girl must let go of her father’s hand in order to reach out and grab hold of something new.

THANKS A LOT, ZETTA ELLIOTT. I AM NOW WEEPING INTO MY COFFEE CUP. You pretty much nailed what it’s like trying to take my daughter anywhere. And what I hope she will be able to do when she sees another child having a hard time, too. Add to that the special relationship fathers and daughters can have. I can’t even.

A little girl goes all sorts of places holding her father’s hand- the library, crossing the street, etc. It’s a comforting gesture that makes her feel safe and protected. But one day she finds herself holding his hand at school and he’s telling her it’s time to let go. He’ll be back later and that is HARD. He explains that although they are not holding hands, she can hold him in her heart until he returns. Still the little girl is scared and upset until the teacher brings over another little girl who is having an equally hard time. Just then the little girl knows just what to do. She grabs the other girl’s hand, says a few comforting words, and the two head off to play together as dad slips out the door.

Although the book packs an emotional punch that gets at  how hard it is for many kids to separate from their parents (and speaks to the parent who has mixed emotions about that step their child is taking away from them), it never feels saccharine. Yes, even despite my misty (okay, teary!) eyes. It reminds me of The Kissing Hand which I find just too sappy. I don’t know why, but I do. With the twist of the little girl helping another girl, a new friend, feel better the story feels more genuine and less about separating from the father and more about the girl finding her way into the world.

Every library who serves young children needs this book. Particularly school libraries. We always, always, always have a few kids each year that have a hard time saying goodbye to mom or dad. Ones who are a little bit scared and just need a little push in the right direction. Talk about a perfect book for story time in those first few days of school.

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