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25

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Furqan’s First Flat Top written and illustrated by Robert Liu-Trujillo

On 25, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Furqan's First Flat TopFurqan’s First Flat Top written and illustrated by Robert Liu-Trujillo

From Amazon: Furqan Moreno wakes up and decides that today he wants his hair cut for the first time. His dad has just the style: a flat top fade! He wants his new haircut to be cool but when they get to the barbershop, he’s a bit nervous about his decision. He begins to worry that his hair will look funny, imagining all the flat objects in his day to day life. Before he knows it, his haircut is done and he realizes that his dad was right-Furqan’s first flat top is the freshest!

I’ll point out right at the start that this a book that was published with a Kickstarter campaign. I know that some libraries cannot buy books that are self-published or not reviewed. Sad for them. This book is amazing.

Liu-Trujillo is an incredible artist. I am always impressed when people can successfully paint anything besides a wash with watercolor, but he’s managed to capture expressions, places, and objects perfectly. Furqan Bathroom SceneI adore the illustration with the father shaving in the bathroom in mismatched socks and his underwear while Furqan stands by the tub with a tentative look on his face. Throughout the book the dad has the look of love on his face as he reassures Furqan and supports him by taking him to the barbershop.

The story is a sweet one about Furqan wanting to cut his hair. He’s always worn it short and curly, but he thinks he wants a flat top. Liu-Trujillo has perfectly captured the illogical anxiety kids can have over everyday things like haircuts. Furqan worries his hair will be flat like a pancake or record. He’s also worried about the reaction he’ll get at school. While the story is about a change in hairstyle, I think it applies more broadly to the anxiety children can have over their first haircut. Will it hurt? Will it look silly? Will it grow back?

Liu-Trujillo also nails a supportive and reassuring dad. I appreciate the book even more for mentioning a mom, but not showing her involved in the story. Even as an involved mother I want to share books with my daughter that show dads can be involved and good parents too. If you have young kids who may be getting their first haircuts or older kids who may want to change their style you have an automatic audience.  The cover and illustrations are so appealing that kids will pick this off the shelf and want to take it home regardless of their hair. Pair it with Zetta Elliot’s A Hand to Hold for books about first experiences and wonderful dads.

If you can buy this book, do it. The copy I ordered came in a beautifully addressed envelope! It was signed and had three stickers, too! I should also point out that I read it to my daughter and I’m going to have to order a new copy for the library because she loves this book.

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23

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Auntie’s Crown by Margeaux Johnson

On 23, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Auntie's CrownAuntie’s Crown written by Margeaux Johnson, illustrated by Sharee Miller

From Little Blk Books: Everyone is excited about Auntie Cynthia’s wedding – everyone except little Femi. He is not excited about having to share his room or meeting new cousins who may play with his toys. What do weddings have to do with little boys anyway? When his family arrives from Nigeria, Femi is amazed at the beautiful crowns and colorful garments they wear. With the help of Auntie Koy, he learns the value of family and the importance of tradition.

I signed my daughter up for the Wam! Book Bundle which sends us three books a month that feature diverse characters. It’s always a big deal when the box shows up on our porch. This past month they included their first independently published book and it was the first book my daughter picked out to read.

The story reminded me a bit of The Wedding Week, another phenomenal independently published book that I reran yesterday, in that Femi’s family is Nigerian (although he and his parents live here in the US) and they’re prepping for an upcoming wedding. Here, though, the story is about building up cultural pride. Femi is bored by the idea of a wedding (“Wedding? For the last few months Mommie and his Aunties looked at girl stuff and got excited about silly flowers.”) and worried about sharing his bedroom and toys with visiting cousins (“From left to right, and every space in between, he couldn’t find a single place where his cousins could sleep.”).

Fortunately Auntie Koy steps in to help Femi see the positive side of weddings. She explains that everyone will be wearing a crown, geles for the women and filas for the men. The tradition started a long time ago and is meant to show everyone that their people are royalty. Femi begins to think it might not be so bad after all if he gets to be a prince. And when his cousins show up he discovers they’re actually a lot of fun to have around.

The wedding is a success and Femi has a blast. Even though he’s sad everyone has left he draws on the warm feelings his Auntie Koy left him with around the meaning of the fila he has to wear and the memories of the wedding. The book does a really good job of balancing giving the reader a story to follow and providing cultural information. It’s buy turns funny and heart warming.

The reading level is maybe just a little lower than most picture books which would make it a good selection if you have kids that want to try and read these books on their own. Otherwise it’s right in the mix. The book itself is paperback which I know can be a drag for libraries. The print quality is actually quite good, though. The pages are a nice thick, glossy paper. I think this is a must for library collections if you can order books like this. It’s a great story with bright and inviting illustrations and it centers family and cultural pride.

If you are interested order the book here on their website: Little Blk Books

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20

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Education Is Power by Lenny Williams

On 20, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Education is PowerEducation Is Power: A Snippet in the Life of W.E.B. DuBois written by Lenny Williams, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

From Goodreads: This story is about African-American civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois and it teaches children about the need for education. Young W.E.B. Du Bois will be talking about how education gave him the POWER to become a great learner and a great teacher. This power, found through education, led him to become a leader, an author, a humanitarian, an activist, and an overall great person that made an impact in the world. Du Bois encourages children that they can do whatever they put their mind too through the power of education.

Like Ida B. Wells, DuBois is one of those historical figures I know by name, but could not have told you why he is well known. Education is Power both answered that question for me and intrigued me enough to look him up and I suspect it will do the same for kids and educators using the book. That is the beauty and genius of the Snippet in the Life series from Melanin Origins. It is so good at introducing important black and African-American figures that we should all know but our history classes leave out in favor of an all-white, primarily male, cast of characters.

While some may complain that the book is light on historical facts and dates, I have found that to be a blessing when reading them with my students and daughter. Education is Power (and the other Snippet books) uses a more narrative approach to introducing DuBois. The reader is taken chronologically through his life and touches on a variety of his experiences and accomplishments without being overly detailed. The important thing to remember here is that these books are geared toward young readers, two or three years old up to about six or seven years old. Books that contain too much information overwhelm these young readers, particularly if they have already been turned off to reading by a lack of representation in the stories that have been shared with them. But even the most intrepid six year old will quickly lose interest in a history book that is too dense, even if it is for children.

On top of the historical lesson, the message here is a good one. I worry that education is not always the magic pill to break free of poverty and discrimination, especially for people of color, but education still goes a long way in helping people achieve. Education is Power drives the message home that education is a tool that can be used to empower those who put in the time and effort to attain it. As with the other books in the series, the message is front and center, but doesn’t read as ham-fisted.

Another feature of the Snippet in the Life series is featuring the historical figure as a contemporary young person and Education is Power follows the trend. While this seemed odd at first, I have found it makes these figures and their messages clearer and more easily identifiable for the young audiences the books are geared toward. It just does.

Definitely add this one to your biography collections if your library or classroom serves young kids.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here:

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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18

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Milo’s Museum written by Zetta Elliott

On 18, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

milos-museumMilo’s Museum written by Zetta Elliott, illustrated by Purple Wong

From Goodreads: Milo is excited about her class trip to the museum. The docent leads them on a tour and afterward Milo has time to look around on her own. But something doesn’t feel right, and Milo gradually realizes that the people from her community are missing from the museum. When her aunt urges her to find a solution, Milo takes matters into her own hands and opens her own museum!

It’s just a Zetta Elliott kind of week around here. Whatever she publishes, I buy it as soon as it’s available (or as soon as I find out about it) and you should too. Milo’s Museum is a book I wish I had had as a kid, because after seeing Milo create her own museum, I would have done the exact same thing. Milo does it for reasons that would not have been my own, but just the idea of curating your own collection was (and still kind of is!) incredibly enticing.

This book was interesting in light of reading the Tonya Bolden book about the building of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Milo doesn’t see herself in the local museum she visits on a field trip so she decides to create her own. That brought to mind part of the impetus behind the NMAA. As Milo walks around the museum she becomes increasingly uncomfortable. She isn’t quite sure why, but eventually realizes that she isn’t seeing herself or her community reflected in any of the art or artists.

I would highly recommend this for school libraries and classrooms. Be sure to read it before and/or after visiting a museum on a class field trip. I think it will certainly inspire kids of all ages to curate and create their own museums that reflect them and their communities. And I would encourage you to help your students do just that. Milo takes different people through her museum so you can see what she has chosen. She also gives explanations for why she has chosen objects. This provides a good model for helping students choose what they want in their own museum. I also think with older students you could open up a discussion about who decides what will go into a museum and how that unfairly tends to keeps certain artists and people out of them.

An all around inspiring and important book. As with Melena’s Jubilee, if you have the money this is a must to have on your shelves.

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16

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Swift Walker: A Journey Around the Oceans by Verlyn Tarlton

On 16, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Swift WalkerSwift Walker: A Journey Around the Oceans written by Verlyn Tarlton, illustrated by Norma Andriani Eka Putri, editing and research by Candace E. West, maps by Norma Adnriani Eka Putri

From the publisher: Swift Walker loved to walk fast. His sister warned him, “One day, you’ll walk so fast you won’t be able to stop!” Sure enough, his speedy legs took him on a journey to see all the oceans of the world.

This was the perfect introduction to the names and locations of the world’s oceans. Swift Walker is a young boy who loves to move and as he’s out walking one day he finds himself exploring the six oceans on our planet. After a quick jaunt around the globe Swift finds himself at home just in time for dinner.

This was the perfect level for preschool, Kindergarten and even first grade. It didn’t get too detailed so the story and information wasn’t bogged down. I tested the book out with my daughter and caught myself wondering if they book should have had more facts and details. However, I noticed that my daughter was super engaged and didn’t ask to skip sections or just flip the page in the middle of reading as she does with nonfiction books that do have more. I realized it was right where she needed it to be. It’s a simple introduction to the idea of geography and that while we have one big ocean we do break it down into smaller sections that share location and ecology. Working a fun character and silly story into the book made the information much easier for her to take in too. I think Swift will be recognizable to most kids. He can’t keep still and wants to set off on adventures.

I would like to point out the font in the book (you can see it there on the cover with the subtitle). It’s a pretty traditional school font, kind of like D’Nealian. For kids learning to read and recognize letters these familiar and simple fonts are so important to have in books. As much as I love a beautiful font and fun with text elements in picture books they can make the reading experience frustrating and nearly impossible for emerging readers. The simplicity of this book would make this one a great shared reading experience with a parent and child or student and teacher. The illustrations are bright and colorful and make for a fun reading experience. I will say, I’m sorry librarians, it’s paperback. If you can tape it up and bear with it, it will be well worth it. As with a lot of these self published and small press books, you may have to hand sell them. Although with Swift Walker the covers are incredibly inviting, so they may sell themselves if you turn them face out on the shelf or on display.

Ultimately the book was a lot of fun to read and offered a quick dip into the oceans of the world without overburdening young readers. It would make a great addition to collections that serve curious young minds that want to explore the world.

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13

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Barber Chop by Jaki Jones

On 13, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Barber ChopThe Barber Chop written by Jaki Jones, illustrated by Adua Hernandez

From Goodreads: The Barber Chop is a short poem-style book of a little boy describing his experience of going to the barbershop with his father.  Use this as a tool to ease your child’s grooming experience and boost literacy as they wait patiently for their “chop”.

I think haircuts are a universal fear of all children. I know my own daughter did not get her first actual haircut until she was six and half years old. Yes, really. She would cry about going to the salon if we even mentioned it. Fortunately for us, we could put off the haircut.

For parents needing a way to introduce the idea of getting a trim and open conversations about what might happen and the feelings a child might have, The Barber Chop is a great book for that. The little boy in the story has large expressive eyes and the accompanying text shares his apprehension at how this trip to the barber is going to go. The story walks the reader through the process of getting to the barber’s shop, what it looks like inside, and actually hopping up into the chair to get a fresh cut. The story validates children’s fear while assuring them that everything will be just fine.

There is no shortage of books addressing this milestone (and surprisingly most of them feature boys), but this one stands out for its aim toward a younger audience. Most famlies will not wait as long as ours did to get that first trim and if you are wanting to prep your little one, you’ll want a book where the text is geared toward them.  While we absolutely adore Furqan’s First Flattop, The Barber Chop is better suited to younger kids. It’s shorter with rhymed text making it easier for little ones to sit through and comprehend. Definitely check out Furqan too, but go for this one first. Also look at Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut that came out last year at least for the pictures if the text proves too complicated for your first-time salon patron.

I absolutely love the illustrations in this by Hernandez who also illustrated Maxine’s New Job. In Barber Chop, Hernandez has drawn an adorable doe-eyed boy. The eyes are particularly effective in conveying his nervousness about the upcoming trim. Despite the worry on his face, how can you not love that cover?! The illustrations, done digitally, have this warm glow to them that make very inviting and help make the experience feel less threatening. The large format of the book make it good for little hands to pick up and ask to be read to. A vibrant black neighborhood can be seen in the background as the little boy and his dad venture out for this first cut. As I always say in these reviews, representation matters and Hernandez delivers on that important front.

If you serve young kids, public libraries, preschools, and home libraries, be sure to order a copy.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

 

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11

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: The Monkey King’s Daughter written by T. A. DeBonis

On 11, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Monkey King's DaughterThe Monkey King’s Daughter written by T. A. DeBonis

From Goodreads: The Monkey King’s Daughter isn’t about Sun Wukong, the Monkey King – it’s about his daughter, Meilin. Only, Meilin doesn’t know she’s the Monkey King’s daughter. In fact, she doesn’t know she’s half-monkey at all. As far as Meilin knows, she’s an ordinary 14 year-old high school freshman from Midland Hills, California, facing all the problems that bright young girls face at that age- flakey girlfriends, zits, too much homework, bad hair, obnoxious boys… But all of that changes when her ancient past catches up with her. (And she thought high school was gonna be easy…)

Today I have another great self published series. I said in another recent review that I am getting rather tired of Greek mythology. Because of Percy Jackson it seems to be everywhere. As a kid I went through a phase where I was into Greek mythology and I still enjoy it, but there is a lot of really interesting mythology out there (I was always way more fascinated with Egyptian mythology) and I wish I had been able to discover it as a young reader. The Monkey King’s Daughter is based in Chinese stories of the Monkey King. If you’ve read Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese you will be familiar with the myth this book draws on. Plenty of it is explained in the course of the story and will make sense to kids unfamiliar with it.

Despite Melin’s age and the fact that she’s in high school, the book is totally appropriate for upper elementary. It’s perfect for kids who like to age up. I would also highly recommend it for lower readers in middle school. The story is exciting enough, but the reading level isn’t particularly difficult.

The pacing was off in a few places. Most of the time the story plugged along, but there were a couple places where things happened a little quickly, felt rushed, and were glossed over. I think this has less to do with it being self published and more to do with the reading level it’s intended for. I don’t know exactly where it falls, but it’s a little more difficult than beginning chapter books, but not nearly as difficult as Percy Jackson (or as long).

My only other complaint is that when Meilin meets her father for the first time she isn’t awkward or angry or anything. She runs into his arms and they spend an evening star gazing together, enjoying each other’s company. I just had a hard time believing that a kid who hasn’t met her father would feel overwhelming love for a man who was never around. Will most kids care about this? The only kids who might are ones who have not met their fathers or who have experienced meeting them later in life. Does that make the book unworthy? I don’t think so. I doubt most kids who will tear through the adventure in this will mind that it isn’t totally authentic. Just be aware it may fall a little flat for some readers.

I really hope this story leads kids to the original Monkey King stories from the different parts of Asia. They’re very exciting and funny. Meilin takes some things in stride, but she was a very realistic kid. She didn’t suddenly become good at everything when she discovered her heritage and fell into her adventure. This is the first in a series and I’ll be buying the rest (I bought the first to try it out). It’s well worth having on our library shelves, particularly if you have kids who love mythology (we all have Riordan fans) and kids who like action.

 

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09

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: One of a Kind, Like Me by Laurin Mayeno

On 09, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

One of a KindOne of a Kind, Like Me/ Unico Como Yo written by Laurin Mayeno, illustrated by Robert Liu-Trujillo

From Goodreads: Tomorrow is the school parade, and Danny knows exactly what he will be: a princess. Mommy supports him 100%, and they race to the thrift store to find his costume. It’s almost closing time; will Danny find the costume of his dreams in time?

This is another one of Liu-Trujillo’s books that I had intended to put in the library collection, but was not allowed to leave our house by my daughter. We probably read this once a week. Her favorite, the spread of Nifty Thrifty, the thrift shop Danny and his mom visit to find his costume. There are racks and racks of clothes and she loves to see if she can spot any purple before Danny and his mom start their search aisle by aisle.

This is a must purchase for any family or library looking to add books about gender non conforming kids. While I’m all for books like I Am Jazz that focus on being either gender non-conforming or transgender (those must be in your collection too!), I think the beauty of this particular story is that Danny just wants a purple princess costume. There isn’t much beyond that and that’s fine. We’ve had boys come through our lower school who haven’t struggled with gender identity per se, but love to wear dresses and fancy shoes. This book is for them. Danny is confronted by his friends at the end, but he has the perfect response. Mom and Grandpa are both super supportive and don’t bat an eye when Danny presents the picture of his costume.

The story is also a great one about using your imagination and making something when you can’t find exactly what you’re looking for. Danny is convinced that his purple princess dress is at Nifty Thrifty, but they can’t find it. Just before the story closes Danny realizes all the pieces of it are there. He and his mom just have to put them together. After some cutting and sewing Danny has the costume he pictured and it’s perfect.

The pastel color palette is perfect for the gentle story and the pictures alternate between lots of white space and racks of clothing filling the page. As always the people are lovely and have great expressions and body language.

I don’t think this should be the only book you have in your collection about gender non conforming kids. It must also include books like I Am JazzJacob’s New Dress, and Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress. (I am having a MUCH harder time finding books for gender non conforming girls.) But it should absolutely be there. It’s for those kids who aren’t quite sure yet about themselves and need to see their reflections. It’s also for those kids who are out there and want to be different. They’ll see themselves too. And it’s for their classmates, so they can see their diverse world, the one they see everyday, reflected. And if you think you don’t have one of those kids in your school, buy it anyways. You might not know that you do, you might eventually, and your students will eventually encounter someone like Danny. They deserve to see a wider world too.

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06

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Taylor’s STEM Adventures: Hawaii by Mary Payton

On 06, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Taylors STEM HawaiiTaylor’s STEM Adventures: Hawaii written by Mary Payton, illustrated by M. Ridho Mentarie

From Goodreads: Taylor’s STEM Adventures Hawaii is the first in a series of stories about the young son of two military members from STEM career fields. As his family moves to various duty locations, Taylor guides you through his adventures in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) at each military base. Taylor gives military children the insight into the STEM adventures and activities that await them in their next military move.

I tested this one out on my in-house book tester (i.e. my six-year-old daughter) and we absolutely loved it! STEM is a hot trend in education and while I tend to hate things that become wildly popular as they rarely measure up to the hype, I do love STEM and STEAM. Not only are they important for our kids to become well versed in, but they are interesting and encourage children to be inquisitive, something that’s been really lacking in traditional education for awhile.

Taylor’s parents both work in the U.S. military which is why they live in Hawaii. Books with military families are not particularly easy to come by. Even less so are books with military families where deployment isn’t the main focus. Here Taylor has two parents involved in STEM careers in the military and from them he has had a love of these subjects fostered.

Taylor’s STEM Adventures is part Hawaiian tour, part conversation starter. The book does a couple things with the things Taylor introduces the reader to. First, he gives a broad swath of ways STEM can be found in Hawaii and in everyday life. Second, it creates interest around the concepts and ideas. We stopped at many different points and talked more about volcanoes, observatories, coral reefs, architectures, and history. It was particularly apropos because of the volcano that has been erupting in Hawaii that’s been in the news. Taylor shows the reader how Hawaii was formed and the role volcanoes played. He takes you to historical and scientific points of interest. He also discusses oceanography and a couple famous buildings on Oahu. It’s not unlike the Snippet in the Life series also published by Melanin Origins in that these topics are introduced, but not discussed at great length, allowing readers to take interest and then pursue the ones they find most relevant to themselves. This will help hold the interest of younger readers while guiding older readers to new subjects and ideas.

If you’re looking for some good nonfiction titles to pique interest and encourage curiosity make sure to add this to your collection! Also be sure to hand it to Moana fans that want to get a little more serious about learning about the part of the world she came from. I can’t wait to see more STEM adventures with Taylor.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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04

Jul
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: The Remembering Day/ El Dia de los Muertos written by Pat Mora, illustrated by Robert Casilla

On 04, Jul 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Remembering DayThe Remembering Day/ El Dia de los Muertos written by Pat Mora, illustrated by Robert Casilla

From Goodreads: Long ago in what would come to be called Mexico, as Mama Alma and her granddaughter, Bella, recall happy times while walking in the garden they have tended together since Bella was a baby, Mama Alma asks that after she is gone her family remember her on one special day each year. Includes facts about The Remembering Day, El dia de los muertos.

I bought this one for our Spanish collection and because I know several classes, including our music class, study El dia de los muertos. Mora imagines a time when the tradition of El dia de los muertos began in this sweet story about Bella and her grandmother. The story is fairly quiet as the two remember the happy times they have had together. As Mama Alma realizes she is going to die she asks Bella to start a celebration of those who have died in their village.

I think this one would make a great addition to any collection. While it has the cultural component of looking at El dia de los muertos, it’s meaning and possible origin, it is also a story about a grandparent dying. I think it would be a good story to offer to children and families who have lost someone. My own family celebrates the Celtic version of a remembering day each fall and this would be a fantastic book to read at that time.

I loved that Mora’s first line makes it clear that this is something that started before colonizers from Europe came and she touches on it again in the note at the end of the story. Remembering the dead is not uniquely Catholic or even Christian and the practice goes back much further into our human history. I think it’s important to acknowledge that with our students and children.

The illustrations are warm and inviting. They show Bella and Mama Alma working in their garden, weaving, and playing together. The soft, warm colors enhance the nostalgic and gentle mood of the text. The text is a bit on the long side so your mileage may vary with very young audiences. I bought this specifically for my second grade classes, but I think it could be read up into fifth grade and down into Kindergarten. The story is just so worthwhile.

I am curious, the title in English is The Remembering Day while the Spanish title is El Dia de los Muertos. I understand that the holiday is about remembering and respecting the dead, so does that mean The Remembering Day is a more accurate translation? I like it better. Calling it the Day of the Dead always brings Halloween to mind for my students and sort of sucks the meaningful significance out of the holiday (we are actually one of those families that do not celebrate American Halloween, for the record, so this could just be a personal bugaboo). To my limited knowledge of the holiday The Remembering Day seems a lot more inline with what the holiday is about.

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