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21

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Water Walker by Joanne Robertston

On 21, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Water WalkerThe Water Walker written and illustrated by Joanne Robertson

From Goodreads: The determined story of an Ojibwe grandmother (nokomis), Josephine Mandamin, and her great love for nibi (water). Nokomis walks to raise awareness of our need to protect nibi for future generations and for all life on the planet. She, along with other women, men and youth, has walked around all the Great Lakes from the four salt waters, or oceans, to Lake Superior. The walks are full of challenges, and by her example she challenges us all to take up our responsibility to protect our water, the giver of life, and to protect our planet for all generations.

Based on a true story, The Water Walker, shares the story of Josephine Mandamin, a woman who was inspired by a prophecy to protect water. The book tracks her activism around water protection and the group of Water Walkers that she formed who join her on her many walks across North America.

I appreciate that the book shows simple activism. There are not organized marches here, no fundraisers, no political campaigns. Just a woman with a passion and a pair of shoes. Activism comes in many forms, but this is an accessible form for children. Just get out and do something to make a point and draw attention to an issue you’re passionate about. Don’t feel like you have to raise tons of money or get celebrities to endorse your cause.

It has the most adorable illustrations. They are bright and inviting and have a child-like feel to them that will really appeal to kids. To be clear, I don’t think a child could have drawn these, just the stylized form and watercolor/marker (?) medium make it feel like children’s drawings. Kids love to see books that mirror their art and are often inspired by them to make their own books and tell their own stories.

I love that Ojibwe words are just dropped into the text and not translated. This centers an Ojibwe-speaking audience instead of a non-Native audience. There are a lot of children’s books out there that are faux-Native, but this is an #ownvoices story that doesn’t pander to a white audience. There is a little glossary at the back of the book so if you couldn’t figure out what the word is from the context, there’s help. Also, it’s contemporary, not historical. It is vitally important that we show our students and children that Indigenous people are still here despite the best efforts of the U.S government (and previous colonial powers) to eradicate them.

While you could certainly use this book during Native American Heritage Month, it should be out all year long. Indigenous people are still here and they deserve representation in our classrooms and on our shelves all year long. Water is also a perennial issue with climate change, drought, Flint, Michigan, pollution, and myriad other issues that bring it to the forefront. You should be talking about these things with your children and your students. If you want to work it into a classroom study, use it with the water cycle. Put it out near the water table or with your water play station. Use it near Earth Day or when you study recycle/reduce/reuse. Pull it out when your kids are letting the faucet run too long while they wash their hands or brush their teeth. Or just use it to start a conversation about environmental justice. It’s a great way to get representation into science lessons and a great way to work environmental justice and social justice into lessons where we haven’t traditionally seen those topics. However you use it, put it on your shelf and get it into kids hands.

Pair this one with Young Water Protectors by Aslan Tudor.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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17

Nov
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Nonfiction Review: They She He Me: Free to Be! by Maya and Matthew Gonzalez

On 17, Nov 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

They She He MeThey She He Me: Free to Be! written and illustrated by Maya and Matthew Gonzalez

From the publisher: Pronouns sere as a familiar starting point for kids and grown-ups to expand ideas about gender and celebrate personal expression with fun imagery that provides a place to meet and play. 

I don’t normally read other reviews prior to writing my own, but I happened to read some for this book and I want to address something I saw in a couple of them. And that is the idea that this book must be read with a parent to help children understand it. I call b.s. on that idea. It can absolutely be used as a conversation starter between parent and child (or educator and child) and since many young children cannot read on their own it may be a shared reading experience. But, the idea that kids need an adult to explain the idea of gender and especially a non-binary idea of gender to them is very, very gender normative and promotes cisgender as both normal and dominant. I think most children understand that male and female and the roles “traditionally” assigned to those labels are very limiting and frequently inadequate in expressing how they feel about gender. I certainly remember the feeling of “not being a good girl” because I liked to run around with the boys and because I wasn’t into pink or princesses, while still having close girl friends and loving My Little Ponys and identifying at cisgender female. Kids understand that a gender binary is too limiting, even if they identify as cisgender and this book gives them validation that they are right about that and also gives them the language they can use to express that.

Okay, with that out of the way, this is wonderful little book to have on your shelves. It’s very simple in it’s execution, which actually makes it work well as a picture book and an easy reader. Just a quick note, “they”, “she”, “he”, “me”, “we”, “to” and “be” are all sight words (words kids need to memorize on sight instead of sounding out each and every time they encounter them in a text). Very young kids will enjoy reading through this and looking at the people and even older children will be captivated by the ideas shown here (my seven year old still likes to read this one).

Maya’s illustrations are always so charming. Happy people and children with flushed cheeks, she presents a mix of skin colors, clothing, ability, and hair. Babies and toddlers, who love faces, will enjoy looking at the pictures, while young kids will enjoy the added experience of seeing the pronouns the people identify with below them. If you can read this to babies and toddlers all the better, as it will counteract some (but by no means all) of the societal pressure to conform to narrow ideas of male and female.

This is definitely one to have in your home and on your library shelves. Might you get push back from parents and patrons? Yes. But don’t let that deter you. Kids who don’t conform to the male-female binary deserve and need to see themselves in our books. We also need to give kids the vocabulary to describe gender. Please read my post about soft censoring books for more on the insidious nature of caving to the pressure of possible complaints.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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18

Oct
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: The Gender Wheel by Maya Christina Gonzalez

On 18, Oct 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

The Gender WheelThe Gender Wheel: A Story About Bodies and Gender written and illustrated by Matthew and Maya Christina Gonzalez

From Goodreads: This body positive book is a powerful opportunity for a supportive adult and child to see a wide range of bodies, understand the origins of the current binary gender system, how we can learn from nature to see the truth that has always existed and revision a new story that includes room for all bodies and genders. The Gender Wheel offers a queer centric, holistic framework of radical gender inclusion in a kid-friendly way for the budding activists who will change our world. This is our world!

You can’t claim to want to diversify your shelves if you aren’t also including books about gender diversity. Fortunately there are a few good resources out there to help you with that, including this gem from Maya Gonzalez and Reflection Press.

Let’s be clear sexuality and gender are NOT the same. The book does talk about the outside and inside of bodies, but sexuality is not a part of this discussion.* Gonzalez does a phenomenal job explaining in child-friendly and appropriate language that people and bodies come in all different forms. She begins by decolonizing the idea of gender. She very bluntly calls out the history of European colonization that set up the damaging girl-boy binary of gender. She addresses it, notes that it is just plain wrong, and then moves on to affirm and explain that gender is fluid, infinite, and natural using a circle.

Gonzalez has published two different versions of this text, one with naked bodies and one with clothed bodies.She has drawn some children with bodies that look ambiguous and that have parts that match what we think of as male and female but aren’t. If at all possible, include the one with naked bodies on your shelves. Nakedness is not something to be ashamed of or feared and teaching children to be ashamed of, to hate, and be ignorant of naked bodies, especially their own, does them a major disservice. DO NOT let this fall into some sort of cisgendered obsession with body parts, but know it can help kids grasp these concepts, especially younger kids who need more concrete explanations. I know for my own daughter it was helpful to understand that there is a lot of in between with genitalia. That being said, plenty of schools may not be comfortable or able to have naked kids on their shelves, so you will have to take that into consideration.

In addition to the outside circle which deals with how a body looks and feels on the outside, Gonzalez also includes an inner wheel which addresses both inside parts (body parts that can’t be seen) and how a person feels about their gender and identifies themselves. This includes pronouns and labels. The two wheels can move separately so that the body does not always match the same pronoun, label, or feeling/identity. This is brilliant. Children will grasp this concept. For young audiences you can hop over to the Reflection Press website and download the wheel from their free resources and actually make it to use as a prop.

There is one more VERY important piece to this book that must be mentioned. The Gender Wheel is part of a larger set or series that includes a wonderful simple, easy reader and a workbook. Gonzalez has developed a curriculum around this that would be wonderful for schools and libraries to have available for their teachers and families. But her work was stolen by some other authors who are published by a larger publishing house. You can and should read about this here on Gonzalez’ blog. BUT BE SURE TO SUPPORT HER AND HER WORK BY PURCHASING THIS BOOK AND SERIES AND NOT THE PLAGIARIZED ONE.

So, to diversify your bookshelves look to The Gender Wheel and the Gender Now curriculum.

*To be clear, you need books that deal with sexuality on your shelves too and it also needs to be an ongoing discussion. It can also be intertwined with gender, but for this book it is not. Sexuality can be a hard sell in libraries so don’t shy away from this book on account of that. But if you are shying away from books that tackle potentially controversial topics unpack that feeling and go read my post about how that kind of thought process upholds white supremacy culture.

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11

Oct
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Nonfiction Review: Young Water Protectors by Aslan Tudor

On 11, Oct 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Young Water ProtectorsYoung Water Protectors: A Story About Standing Rock written by Aslan Tudor, co-written by Kelly Tudor

From Goodreads: At the not-so-tender age of 8, Aslan arrived in North Dakota to help stop a pipeline. A few months later he returned – and saw the whole world watching. Read about his inspiring experiences in the Oceti Sakowin Camp at Standing Rock. Learn about what exactly happened there, and why. Be inspired by Aslan’s story of the daily life of Standing Rock’s young water protectors. Mni Wiconi … Water is Life

I picked up a copy of this book to read on Indigenous People’s Day with my own daughter, but felt it warranted a review here. When I was working in my last library I spent a lot of time combing through the collection that featured nonfiction titles on Native Nations. I weeded old, racist, and inaccurate titles and added a lot of titles that came recommended by Native/Indigenous scholars and librarians or were written by Native/Indigenous authors. This was a particularly important project to me because so many grades in elementary school study Native Americans, either during Native American Heritage Month, with units of study like the California Mission System (ugh), the Gold Rush (ugh, again), or as part of an attempt to incorporate diversity into their curriculums (problematic at best).

One of the most difficult pieces of Native American culture to incorporate and find reflected in kidlit was the fact that Native Americans are still very much alive and here. So. Many. Books relegate them to a sad, wimpy past and that narrative, besides being dangerous, is patently untrue. Children need to see that Native Nations are sovereign and alive and vibrant. There is Jingle Dancer, Powwow Summer, and a handful of others, but they weren’t easy to discover.

I think Standing Rock and the #NoDAPL protest was a very powerful movement and moment to bring that current history (current event?) into the classroom, but I suspect that most teachers were either not aware of it or were fearful of being “too political”. Young Water Protectors, however, allows teachers, parents, and librarians to open a discussion with their students, children, and patrons. Aslan Tudor is a ten year old boy who was eight when he and his family went to the Oceti Sakowin Camp. This is an incredible resource for everyone. Not only does it introduce the idea of sovereignty, it tackles the fact that the land (the whole US, but specifically the Dakotas) were stolen from the people who lived by white colonizers. It also does a really great job of sharing history that led up to the protest, the issues at hand, and Tudor’s personal experience at the camp. Add to this that it can be used to inspire budding authors to pen their own stories of resistance. It can be used in conjunction with units on Native Nations, environmentalism, and social justice.

For those of you who are fearful of being “too political” I suggest you look long and hard at that statement and the privilege it carries. The book does a good job of skirting around finger pointing, while still calling out the politics and economics that allowed the pipeline to happen. The photographs are quite nice and illustrate the subject well. The book is also an #ownvoices, as Tudor is a citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe. Be sure to add this to your shelves and collections. Pair it with The Water Walker by Joanne Robertson which I will be reviewing soon.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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28

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Look for Me written by Frank Minikon, illustrated by Mark “Mas” Stewart

On 28, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Look for MeLook for Me: A Snippet in the Life of Marcus Garvey written by Frank Minikon, illustrated by Mark “Mas” Stewart

From Goodreads: Young Marcus Garvey was a person with a big dream. He dreamed of gathering people all across the globe so they could come together and work collectively using each other’s strengths. Garvey created a newspaper company, a shipping company, and several organizations with the idea that we could progress as a people and take care of each other like a big family. He was educated, organized, and dedicated. In this story you’ll read about his message, and how he inspired people all across the globe. Marcus Mosiah Garvey was a man of the people and, despite the many challenges of life, he swirled around the globe with the energy of a whirlwind saying to one and to all: “Look for Me.”

I am always fascinated by people from the 1920s, 30s and 40s. From the ones I’ve read about they seem to have been able to just go out and get jobs doing things. Exciting things. Like writing for newspapers, starting companies, jumping from field to field. And I can’t quite figure out if that’s because they were just braver than me, or if it was just easier for them. Like maybe regulations weren’t as strict and expectations weren’t so narrow?

Marcus Garvey is a great example of this. He traveled around and worked as an editor for newspapers in Central America. He organized and started a shipping company that transported goods. He was a speaker in London. Sure, he may not have gotten rich off any of these careers, but you can’t just walk into a newspaper office these days and be an editor. No one is about to have you come speak to their organization without major credentials and even with crowdfunding I think you’d be hard pressed to start in import/export company.

Look For Me is the latest title in the “Snippet in the Life” series from publisher Melanin Origins. It’s also the longest and probably most like a traditional biography of all the books thus far. From the book we learn where he was born and several of the careers he had. While other books in the series have shared similar information, such as Louisiana Belle, in this one it feels much more like a chronological, non fiction, accounting of Garvey’s life. It also talks about his legacy and the final pages feature a timeline of Garvey’s life with his picture.

Despite this, the book is still geared toward younger audiences. While it’s longer than the others, it’s still brief. The actual text doesn’t include any dates or specifics that would be meaningless for small children. But the list in the back of the book is perfect for for parents or teachers who want to extend the learning and history lesson. The illustrations feature more modern looking children which, as I’ve said before with this series, draws kids in. And again, the series focuses on a historic black figure that was very important, but rarely shows up in children’s literature.

Another solid addition to the series. Be sure to round out your collection with it.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

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21

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book Review: Not All Superheroes Wear Capes by Alecia R. Heffner

On 21, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

SuperheroesNot All Superheroes Wear Capes written by Alecia R. Heffner

From Goodreads: Not All Superheroes Wear Capes is a children’s book designed to teach African American students the opportunities available to them in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers. This inspiring book combines positive images of African Americans engaging in exciting careers with a powerful message of how these individuals help others in their daily life.

Kids always love superhero books and this one will give some new superheroes to admire. Not All Superheroes Wear Capes showcases everyday heroes from doctors to dentists to chemists. I love that this book covers STEM careers. I love that it shows women in some of these careers (and not just as a nurse). And I love that it’s a really different mix of STEM professions. There is a chiropractor, a nurse practitioner, and a pharmacist, as well as your typical doctor.

 

In calling these doctors and scientists superheroes, I think the book really encourages children to look around at the real people in their lives doing extraordinary things in ordinary circumstances. They’ve all been to a doctor or a gotten a shot or visited the dentist. Normally those experiences are mundane (or menacing, depending on how they feel about shots), but Not All Superheroes nudges kids to realize that their doctors and nurses have worked hard and are committed to helping people, like them, and that makes them super.

While all children can be inspired by the book, all the characters are black and will speak directly to children of color, showing them they can be these things. That kind of representation, while on the rise, is still rare. There are even few nods to HBCUs in some of the illustrations. The text also emphasizes the hard work ahead of kids who may want to pursue a career in a STEM field, but assures them it’s within reach.

The one issue you might run into with it is length. It covers a lot of territory and might need to be split into more than one reading for your youngest storytime patrons. But it’s a trade off, right? You wouldn’t get all these great careers covered if you don’t have a longer book. The book would be perfect on a classroom shelf or in a school library, but public libraries would also do well to ensure the representation seen in this book is included on their shelves too. Not to mention it would make a great book to share at a superhero themed storytime.

Disclosure: I was sent a review copy by the publisher, Melanin Origins, in exchange for an honest review.

Purchase the book here (not affiliate links):

On IndieBound: paperback and hardback

On Amazon as an ebook.

Final note: If you do purchase this book, please post a review of it on Amazon. This will help other folks find the book and know that it’s worth purchasing. If you use any other book services like GoodReads or your local library’s online catalog be sure to post a review there too! And if your local library doesn’t have a copy, request that they purchase one.

 

 

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07

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Picture Book: Ilyas and Duck Search for Allah by Omar Khawaja

On 07, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Ilyas and DuckIlyas and Duck Search for Allah written by Omar Khawaja, illustrated by Leo Antolini

From Goodreads: Ilyas and Duck search for Allah is an adorable storybook for kids about a boy’s quest to find God. “Where is God?” is a question that any muslim parent teaching their kids will one day have to answer. This book helps parents answer that question from an Islamic perspective while conveying the profound mystery of it all in a fun way. In this story, lovable Ilyas pairs up with Duck to ask the one question repeatedly in different scenarios. With whimsical and poetic replies, Ilyas slowly begins to realize what his question truly means. 

This was a beautiful book gifted to us by some friends. I saw it at their house and was amazed at how simply and beautifully it took a very deep and complex idea and distilled it down into something children can easily understand without taking away the majesty of the concept. Plus the illustrations are adorable.

Ilyas and Duck wonder exactly where they can find God and they head out on a rather silly search. In every place they look the pair encounters an animal who clearly knows, but is rather cryptic about answering their question. Slowly, Ilyas comes to realize that God is all around, reflected back in the places and things they meet, and not person to be found in one place.

Children will really appreciate this book for not speaking down to them. It merely puts the idea of God into a form they can grasp. They’ll be drawn in and kept entertained by the silliness of the hunt, especially once they’ve read through it once and heard the punchline (so to speak). The pictures, with darling little Ilyas and cute Duck, will also keep them interested in turning the pages and returning to them.

You should definitely include this in your collection if one of two things is true for your library or classroom. One, if you have Muslim children or families that you serve. This book is written for them to help families explain a complex and abstract concept that is fundamental to monotheistic religions, but can be incredibly difficult for children to grasp. Two, if you have Christian themed books on your shelf. Now be aware these books can be subtle and you may have a blindspot for them in you were raised Christian or are white. Remember, although highly commercialized and nationalized respectively, Valentine’s Day and St. Patrick’s Day are Christian holidays. Chances are good you have books that take a Christian perspective, so balance that out by having books available for your non-Christian families to use.

I’ll admit school libraries may have a harder time making the case to add this kind of book to their collection, but I think it’s also important to point out that while the book uses the Arabic word for God, it doesn’t feel exclusive to Islam. If you have families wanting to explain the concept of God or god or a higher power this book does a phenomenal job of doing just that. The book is probably meant for younger preschool/Kindergarten age kids, but I think because it does such an incredibly job explaining a difficult subject you should consider it for collections that serve older students and children as well, say up into third grade.

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03

Sep
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Rumplepimple by Suzanne DeWitt Hall

On 03, Sep 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

RumplepimpleRumplepimple written by Suzanne DeWitt Hall, illustrated by Kevin Scott Gierman

From Goodreads: Life isn’t easy when your big sister is an annoying cat and your moms can’t understand a word you say. But that doesn’t stop Rumplepimple from saving the day in a most unusual way. Find out how a car ride transforms a naughty terrier into a grocery store hero.

I bought this earlier in the year to put in my Read-T0-A-Dog basket in the library. I bought my own copy a week or two ago and my daughter has been asking to read it frequenly ever since.

I love that this book has a lot to talk about in it. The most obvious is how Rumplepimple stands up to a bully. When a little boy has snatched his sister’s blanket from her in the grocery store, Rumplepimple hears her cry and rushes in to give the blanket back. When I read this with my daughter we talked about how Rumplepimple saved the day and did a good thing by intervening when something wrong was happening.

Of course this is not what his mom sees. After he slips out the car door and rushes into the store he loses his mom. She ultimately finds him peering in the meat department case licking his lips and assumes he has been up to no good. This is also a great conversation starter about doing the right thing even when no one is looking and even if you don’t get recognized for it. It can also lead to discussing doing the right thing even if you get in trouble for it.

While all this is well and good, my daughter and students loved it because Rumplepimple is a cute dog. The story sounds like the thoughts that go through a dog’s head and are quite funny. Or at least what I imagine does. 🙂 I love the nod to The Farside comics with the “Blah, blah, blah, Rumplepimple” line when he’s being scolded in the car after being recaptured.

I have a few design issues, but they’re minor and neither my students nor my daughter noticed them. I wish more of the illustrations filled the page instead of the spot illustrations. There’s a lot of white space in the book and it feels sparse. I think it could have been a couple pages shorter too, but again it’s all minor.

If you want a cute dog story (don’t all kids?), then this book is well worth adding to your collection. It’s paperback so get the book tape out. Rumplepimple has two moms and, while their relationship is not specified, I think it’s implied that they are in a relationship. This is a great book to get some incidental diversity into your storytimes and collections!

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29

Aug
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: A Hand to Hold by Zetta Elliott

On 29, Aug 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Hand to HoldA Hand to Hold written by Zetta Elliott, illustrated by Purple Wong

From Goodreads: Can you hold onto someone with your heart instead of your hand? When it’s time to start school, a little girl must let go of her father’s hand in order to reach out and grab hold of something new.

THANKS A LOT, ZETTA ELLIOTT. I AM NOW WEEPING INTO MY COFFEE CUP. You pretty much nailed what it’s like trying to take my daughter anywhere. And what I hope she will be able to do when she sees another child having a hard time, too. Add to that the special relationship fathers and daughters can have. I can’t even.

A little girl goes all sorts of places holding her father’s hand- the library, crossing the street, etc. It’s a comforting gesture that makes her feel safe and protected. But one day she finds herself holding his hand at school and he’s telling her it’s time to let go. He’ll be back later and that is HARD. He explains that although they are not holding hands, she can hold him in her heart until he returns. Still the little girl is scared and upset until the teacher brings over another little girl who is having an equally hard time. Just then the little girl knows just what to do. She grabs the other girl’s hand, says a few comforting words, and the two head off to play together as dad slips out the door.

Although the book packs an emotional punch that gets at  how hard it is for many kids to separate from their parents (and speaks to the parent who has mixed emotions about that step their child is taking away from them), it never feels saccharine. Yes, even despite my misty (okay, teary!) eyes. It reminds me of The Kissing Hand which I find just too sappy. I don’t know why, but I do. With the twist of the little girl helping another girl, a new friend, feel better the story feels more genuine and less about separating from the father and more about the girl finding her way into the world.

Every library who serves young children needs this book. Particularly school libraries. We always, always, always have a few kids each year that have a hard time saying goodbye to mom or dad. Ones who are a little bit scared and just need a little push in the right direction. Talk about a perfect book for story time in those first few days of school.

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22

Aug
2018

In Review

By Elizabeth Wroten

Rerun: Let’s Celebrate Ramadan & Eid! by Ajanta Chakraborty & Vivek Kumar,

On 22, Aug 2018 | In Review | By Elizabeth Wroten

Let's Celebrate Ramadan and EidLet’s Celebrate Ramadan & Eid!: Muslim Festival of Fasting & Sweets written by Ajanta Chakraborty & Vivek Kumar, edited by Janelle Diller, published by Bollywood Groove

From Goodreads: In this multicultural and educational series from Bollywood Groove, join Maya, Neel and their pet squirrel, Chintu, as they visit a Muslim family in India to celebrate Ramadan & Eid! Kids will learn about history, food, language and cultural elements of Ramadan & Eid… all while making two new best friends!

Since it is currently Ramadan, we got out our holiday books. I decided to purchase this one to review and add to our collection. It’s a mix of nonfiction and fiction where Maya and Neel (and their pet squirrel Chintu) have traveled to India to celebrate the month with family. Through the month they learn about how Ramadan and Eid are celebrated.

Interestingly, there is no mention of why the month is so special to Muslims which seemed strange at first. Then I remembered the four shelves of Christmas books in the library that are bursting with books that make no mention of the reason for that holiday. Why hold books about Muslim holidays to higher standards or expect them to be everything to everyone? Maya and Neel do learn about fasting, reading the Quran, children’s options for celebrating (instead of fasting), and, importantly, that there are two Eids in Islam. They are also taught about the importance of helping those less fortunate. On their final day they meet a number of Muslims from other places and are exposed to customs from those countries.

I really appreciate that Maya and Neel are in India celebrating Ramadan and Eid. It’s not the typical picture of Muslim holidays we see in kids books and that is incredibly important right now. Islam is not a monolith and neither are Muslims (although you would think they are with the current media coverage). Sure, some of the celebrations and certainly the meaning of the holiday is the same no matter who is celebrating, but you see them out wearing more traditionally Indian/Pakistani clothing and eating foods from that region.

The illustrations are a bit static and they aren’t as rich in detail and texture as hand-drawn illustrations are, but they’re just fine. My daughter makes no distinction between these illustrations and those by Caldecott winners. I think more importantly this is another paperback. I’m sorry! I know those are hard in libraries where books circulate a lot. I highly recommend this one to broaden Muslim holiday book collections.

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